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Anybody do any good last year during the spring runs? Icaught A few in the Corsica and wye rivers but few and far between. I think the netters have all but depleated them. Let me know your hot perch holes and I will tell you mine!
 

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Tidal run yellow perch fishing just isn't worth it anymore for me. I drive 1 1/2 hrs to my favorite spot and within 1 hr. I've got my limit of 5 perch. I much rather drive 15 minutes to my favorite spot a Loch Raven and catch yellow perch all day where there isn't a limit and cull the fish I want to take home.

Catman.
 

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Catman,

How is Loch Raven in the Spring for crappies? I have been wanting to check this reservoir out with my jonboat.
 

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Loch Raven is always good for crappie but the early spring is usually excellent. The area directly under the Dulaney Valley Bridge around the cement bridge supports is by far the best. Stop by the fishing center and talk to the guys there. They'll point you in the right direction.

Catman.
 

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I fished for yellow perch around Roosevelt Island on the Potomic River(DC) on small minnows,no limit and good size and nice color. :)
 

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You can pan fry, but I like to bake them in alittle flour-corn meal,all season seasoning and dredge them in a little egg wash and then back into the flour/corn meal mixture and bake them on a rack and slow bake them. If they're big enough you can filet them.
 

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I fillet them all. If they are big enought to keep, they get sided. I dip in egg, then in italian bread crumbs or crushed parmesan flavored croutons, then right into some 400 degree peanut oil. Two minutes and their done. Darn tasty!
 

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I hate picking bones out of fish. I fillet them all. I use the canadian filleting method on smaller fish as it saves a lot of meat. There is very little waste.
 

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Duke...You gonna tell us what the Canadian method is? Is it similar to the "butterfly method" where you end up with one large filet rather than two? I don't know that method either, saw it done once on a cooking show.

Catman.
 

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The canadian method take a little longer, but saves flesh from the rib area.

You start like you normally would with an angled cut behind the head down to the back bone. Next, you insert the tip of the knife into the back of the fish until the tip hits the spine. You can slide the knife right down along side the spines of the dorsal fin, they are a good guide for where to cut. You cut along the top of the back down to the spine until you reach the point at which you are lined up with the anal fin. Poke the blade straight down through the back so it cuts right along side the spine and pops out lying flat against the beginning of the anal fin. From this point you just cut along the back bone toward the tail like you normally would. Once you cut to the tail of the fish, the only part of the fillet that is still attached to the fish is along the ribs. This is the part you would normally cut away entirely while removing the ribs using the standard method. To free the fillet, you gently work the blade down from the fishes back between the meat and ribs until the fillet is free. Skin as usual. I know these are not the best instructions, it is hard to describe. I only use this method on panfish including saltwater species like spot, croaker, porgies, etc. I also use it on heavier boned species like trigger fish, tog, sheepshead.

On fish like trout, blues(rarely keep them, too oily), or mackerel I just use the "normal" method. The only thing I do differently is skinning them. Most people cut down to the skin in the tail section. When I do it, I make the cut to remove the ribs but when I reach the tip of the ribs I turn the knife back toward the meat and skin from there, it saves a little meat that you would normally loose if skinning from the tail.

Flounder are a totally different story, I have a different method them.

I used to butterfly whiting, back before the netters whiped them out off of NJ. I don't know if this is the best method, but I will do my best to explain it. I used to cut the head off and gut the fish. Next you just rub up and down the spine with your thumb, flexing the bone. Eventually it starts to separate from the meat and you just pull it out with the ribs attached. My grandmother is really good at this method. There is probably an easier and neater way, but this is how I have done it. It has been a long time though.

I know this post probably won't be much of a help to you guys, I'd be happy to demonstrate sometime though.
 

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Thanks Duke. I think I can follow that method. Like you said it gets the rib cage meat which is where I waste a lot.

Catman.
 

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Last year was bad for yellows since it got really cold as the run started and more importantly, low waters due to drought.

Yellows bite well in high waters. We just need to warm things up really soon though or face another year of them spawning in the deep guts which leaves us white trash boatless bank fishermen screwed
 
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