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It's really just as simple as I said above. A hook on each end and two loops in between, You can vary the length of the traces and the distance between the loops however you want. I usually make the traces about a foot in length. That leaves a little less than 2 feet between the loops.
 

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Good description Gorge .... make one loop large to thread your sinker on and the other loop small to tie your main line to ..... loops need double knotted to keep from pulling down when you get a fish on ... simple to tie ...
 

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It's really just as simple as I said above. A hook on each end and two loops in between, You can vary the length of the traces and the distance between the loops however you want. I usually make the traces about a foot in length. That leaves a little less than 2 feet between the loops.

I tied one as described to look it over and think. Previously I was using something similar and found that occasionally when I hook something big, the weak point in the rig that breaks is the double overhand knots. Using 40 lb fluoro leader, I tied up a rig very similar to this and hooked a very large stingray. I got it right up next to the pier and it pulled back down and broke me off at the knot. Between that day, and a few others like it, I moved away from double overhand knots for multi-hook rigs in favor or T-knots, (like what is shown in the twisted dropper loop rig video linked by the OP). The T-knots are much stronger and less prone to snapping than the double overhand knots, in my humble experience.

Next time I tie up some rigs I will try a modified river rig using T-knots for the loops rather than double overhand knots. If I remember I will take a photo of the final river rig and will post it here.

T-knot.jpg
 
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