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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
happy new year folks!
Fish Fish Tilapia Tilapia Bluegill

Been having a great year toggin around all the islands. Recently been using a mix of green crabs/blue crabs as well as sand fleas and clams. I've seen them being used at seagull as well. I know they are being sold a local bait shops. I'm just a bit curious on your thoughts of using invasive species here in the bay such as live greenies for bait. I remember a time when they were banned from being used as live bait. The reason I'm putting this out there is because I've read from multiple sources that they are just down right destructive critters once they take over an area. The Ches Bay being buffet of things to feed on.. Is anyone else concerned as to the damage this little critters may cause? Tog/Drum/Sheep/turtles/cownose/skates all eat crabs but will it be enough to hold down there numbers?? :confused:
Greenie crushing periwinkle link.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eihaKEvzzrM
very alarming footage
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r070MIl_krY
 

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in order for them to be brought back into the state for bait usage, i believe the pretense was that they must be killed prior to being used for bait, i.e. cut in half, crushed etc. while we also have used them whole/live i doubt that a green crab would survive being lanced with a 3/0 gami and go on to propagate the species here in the Bay... i also don't know anyone dumping their extra greenies over after a day of fishing, especially given they live for weeks with/without water if kept cool, freeze well and also still work rather well after being frozen... just my .02
 

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They're popular tog bait up in Maryland and Delaware, where they've escaped out on the Atlantic side around Ocean City. You see them climbing around the jetties. As long as you kill them before they go on the hook you're fine. The real problem is people releasing the ones they don't use at the end of a trip. That's probably how they got a foothold up north.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
They're popular tog bait up in Maryland and Delaware, where they've escaped out on the Atlantic side around Ocean City. You see them climbing around the jetties. As long as you kill them before they go on the hook you're fine. The real problem is people releasing the ones they don't use at the end of a trip. That's probably how they got a foothold up north.
I agree. I can see how these little buggars can be mistakenly assumed to be dead. They're incredibly hardy and tolerant of extremes. So for someone to easily chuck over the side like dead fiddlers is easy... This is just my observation... Thanks for the replies guys.
 
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