Pier and Surf Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was fishing the Washington Channel last night still searching for my first hookup with a cow stripper when suddenly my rod bent over. After several blazing fast runs the fish was finally brought to the wall. Instead of a cow stripper I was shocked to find a 10 lb 36" Muskelunge at the other end of the line. He was apparently feeding of the herring in the channel. Ah the joys of spring fishing. Anyone have any recipies?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
Finn -- Wow!!, and I travel all the way to Canada to find northern's and musky. Can you provide more info on bait used, time, and your location? I assume you were fishing from shore at Haines Point in the water I know as the ship channel, between Haines Point and the boat docks on Maine Avenue. If so were you closer to the point or 14th street? Are lights on at night? How far out are fish from the wall? I know I'm asking a lot of questions, but I'm very new at fishing for rock from shore.

Perhaps we can go after Rock/Musky together. See my post on fishing at Fletcher's Boathouse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,457 Posts
by Charles F. Porcari
Spring Fishing in Maryland - A creel full of opportunities
While here on the surface springtime may turn the thoughts of young men to love, below Maryland’s waters the instinctual tug of spawning provides sport fisherman with some of the most spectacular -- and some may say surprising -- fishing opportunities the East Coast has to offer. From the roiled waters of the freshwater Potomac River to the shallow flats of the upper Chesapeake, spring can turn the thoughts of men and women alike to catch-and-release.

First, the Potomac. Lurking in the miles of river between Cumberland and Great Falls are scores of tiger muskies, a truly enormous sterile cross between a muskellunge and a northern pike that the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has been consistently stocking over the past six years.

"The numbers, quality and size are good to excellent and the muskies are going to get bigger and bigger every year. This has turned into a wonderful fishery," says Marty Gary, DNR fisheries biologist.

Over 4,000 of these hybrids, pure top-of-the-food chain predators with no natural enemies in the Potomac, are released into the river each fall between Cumberland and Edwards Ferry. The 8-to10-inch long fingerlings arrive compliments of the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission, who swap their tiger muskie juveniles with the Maryland DNR for striped bass fingerlings. It takes a tiger muskie between 5 and 6 years to grow to a legal size of 36 inches. DNR is also stocking tiger muskies in Little Seneca Lake near Boyd and in Carroll County’s Piney Run Reservoir.

According to Gary, the stretch of Potomac running through Williamsport has become "muskie central" in Maryland, although huge fish are regularly caught in the other stocked portions of the river. In the middle of April, populations of suckers Ð a favorite meal of the tiger muskie- congregate at the mouths of the many creeks running into the Potomac awaiting the change in water temperature that signals them to head up the creek and spawn. For the tiger muskie, this time of year is the waterborne version of the $5.99 all-u-can eat buffet.

DNR Fisheries Biologist John Mullican, who personally has caught a 43-inch tiger muskie and has seen another fisherman land a 47-inch, 29- pound monster, says spring concentrations of forage fish, again mainly suckers, at the base of the various dams on this stretch of river are also provide ideal fishing. He suggests Dam #4 and Dam #5 as particularly fruitful. He further advises that spinners, plugs, jigs and live bait, including suckers are your best bets as you drift or troll.

"They don't eat as often as people may think, but when they do they like to eat large prey," Mullican explains. "It's usually a short but spectacular fight, and sometimes they will jump like a Tarpon does."

As summer begins and water temperatures warm, the tiger muskies retreat to the slow deep pools in the center of the river but do remain active -- and hungry, according to Mullican.

Farther north and to the east are the Susquehanna Flats, the shallows where the waters of Susquehanna River end their long journey from Upstate New York and meld into the Chesapeake Bay. Rockfish, and lots of them, are gathering in preparation for their own springtime spawning ritual. April is the catch-and-release month on the Flats for the hardy fish and Gary says it does not get much better than this.

"This time of year is highly conducive to fly-fishing, and we allow it because our studies show that 94 percent of the fish in the Flats are 16 to 24- inch males, and catch-and-release does little harm to the fish in part due to the colder water," he says. “The large egg-laden females tend to congregate in and around the Elk River and off the Aberdeen Proving Grounds, and thus are spared any significant catch-and-release pressure."

Just up the Susquehanna, not far up from the mouth of Deer Creek, one of the river’s largest Maryland tributaries, another treat awaits.

"April is dead in the heart of catch-and-release season for Hickory Shad," Gary says. "From the mouth of the stream to about mile above the Stafford Road bridge, the fisherman are standing shoulder to shoulder, and there is a very good reason why -- they are great fighters so using a fly rod or ultra light spinning gear provides a great experience."

Deer Creek is not the only option. Hickory shad have begun to re-colonize other rivers as their population has exploded. While Deer Creek gets most of the attention, places like North East Creek, the Gunpowder Falls at Maryland Route 7, Octoraro Creek and the Patuxent River in the Patuxent River Park area also offer great fishing.

The hickory shad, like its cousin, the American shad, are two of the fisheries feel-good stories of the past few years. Abundant when the first settlers arrived, the shad traveled up the Susquehanna and its tributaries far into their northen reaches. Over the years, the fishery declined dramatically due to over fishing, damming of streams and river, pollution and other causes. Recently, a focused stocking program has seen the return of stocked fish from the Atlantic to the waters where they were released. Now in the spring, these aggressive fighters move from their winter grounds off the Atlantic coast and head up the Bay to spawn before returning to the ocean. The hickory shad prefers the more quiet feeder streams to the main stems, Gary said.

"Catch-and-release is all about having fun catching fish, and anglers can do so without feeling they have injured or killed the fish," he says. “Nearly all survive with proper handling and equipment, and that would include single hooks, barbless or crimped barbs and artificial lures coupled with the quick release of the fish back into the water.”

No matter where you live in Maryland or in the Mid-Atlantic region for that matter - as the days lengthen and warm, our waters teem with fish and fishing opportunities. Some are moving to spawn and some are moving to make a meal of other fish while they move to spawn. No matter, they are there, and we are hoping you will be too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Foodfan,

I caught the fish near the Awakening at Haines Point. It was nera the sea wall. I was using a littel over 1/2 of a herring. The herring run is very strong with the fish running along the wall by the hundreds. Apparently he was feeding on these fishes. We he encountered my bait waifing along the wall it just consumed it. I was just lucky, I don't believe that there are many of those fish in the channel, but then again I could be wrong. By the way large rock also cruise the wall looking to suck down a herring dinner. Distance is not that important this time of the year, location is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
Finn -- I appreciate the info. Just curious -- were you fishing after dark, and did you notice if there were lights at your location. Thanks again!! -- Foodfan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
680 Posts
finn74. you plank them. bake slowly at about 325. whem done, lay it between two planks and smash down on them. then scrape off the fish and eat the plank.
:rolleyes: :rolleyes: :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Foodfan,

I caught it at between 7:30 and 7:45pm, it was still daylight but it was fading. Haines Point has street lights only. Some can make do with that, but I bring a lantern.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
5,774 Posts
Husky (and everyone else)--don't post full articles from other publications on the site. It's a copyright violation. Just link to the article or post a small excerpt, which is fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
finn74 - congrats on the musky!

do you think there are any safety issues re: fishing in that area around haines point @ night?

thanks,
CS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,457 Posts
Hey sand flea,
My fault. Sorry. I'm not looking to argue, just am curious on this one. At college, teachers hand out articles all the time. They never contain any more info than the author's name and the article (the same I pasted here). Wouldn't that then be a copyright violation as well? Also, I always thought an article was only copyrighted if it had a copyright symbol. Is that not true either?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,457 Posts
hmm...just did some research online. Apparently there is a growing opinion in the legal arena that a hyperlink to the same article is still against copyright law. What's next? Browsers leading you to articles being against it to?
Lame.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,513 Posts
Hey Finn
Congrad on your musky!!!!
I saw a guy pick up a nice walleye in the wash.channel some years ago on a baby alewife livelining..There are some huge gars in the potomac too . :)
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top