Pier and Surf Forum banner

1 - 20 of 43 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I think this is a good time of year to reflect, and share with each other tips to help us all. If people will list one thing that they think helps catch fish we can all learn something. Here is mine...Use as large a bait as you can get to the fish. If dogs are in the surf ,or blues small bait is what I call a dogfish pellet. I have caught some big fish on heads that I have felt dogsharks chew on several times before it gets eaten.......That is why I like to fish big heads...As big a bait as you can get to the fish....I look forward to some of you guys tips
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,213 Posts
the best discovery I made last year

was that mullet......cut or whole is one excellent bait. A big jump for me from bloodworms, squid, shrimp, and the old basic freshly cut spot, etc....... Spent too many years walking by pier anglers who were using mullet. Never gave a second thought myself to wanting to take on one of the so called elusive big fish. All that time I wasted. Making that discovery and applying it in theory has given my son and I the opportunity to hook and land our largest fish ever. Thanks again to the guy who gave my son his first mullet.

My advice to the small fry catcher would be............don't be intimidated into believing you would be out of your league with using the "big fish" bait. And on the equipment matter.........don't sweat it. If your gear can bring in a skate and stingray, then it should be able to handle a medium puppy drum or striper as well. Once tried and success is achieved it'll have you wondering too why the heck you waited so long to go for it.

One adjustment to this new found awareness would be to make sure you keep your rod secured by any means possible. Just as a ray is capable of doing, a large fish does as well have that capability. And that is.............being able to take a rig right over the rails as well as into the surf.:eek:

In years to come your stories to your kids and grandkids about the one that got away will definitely be more interesting if it is referring to a fish instead of a rod and reel.:cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,022 Posts
Good info so far. My tip would be to always keep a metal rod rigged up with you. Regardless of season while spiking a rod you never know when a school of some thing will swim by an wont hit your bait but people around you get em on metal. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,214 Posts
My tip would be always have the gear with ya or at least in the car or close at hand . I have been in this postion before when I wish I had my gear close at hand , driving near the water and seeing some birds diving or watching something tearing up the bait fish in the surf . It's a little diff for me being near the water just about everywhere you go around here . Guess what missed out on those times but never again all geared up just sound the alarm . So if you see a blitz going down in the middle of the causeway and see some guy pulling over rather quickly it's probably me . Now watch someone break in my car now .:p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,870 Posts
Some off the top of my head are:

1) Hug your wife and kids today.
2) Have some 6/0 and 8/0 hooks pre-tied with about 12" of 50 pound test for the ol' Carolina rig, just in case the sharks and blues do a number, and need a quick change (you can only go so short).
3) When travelling the beach at night, don't shine your headlights if you feel the need to use them straight at a fisherman (we tend to have supersticions or beliefs, that it may scare the fish)
4) Use circle hooks.
5) Toward the end of the season, when you find fresh bunker, buy extra and take home to freeze, you never know when that warm spell might hit in December or January, only to find no bait is available.
6) When at all possoblt, drive in someone olses tracks in the sand (and obey the speed limits), your chances of getting stuck (especially if you air down) greatly decrease.
7) Don't feed the ponies, or the other "WILD" life.
8) At least change your line spring and fall, if not, maybe not tomorrow, but sooner or later you will live to regret.
9) Since I am ending it here so it doesn't seem like a top ten from the David Letterman show when fishing the most important tip I can give, whether the fish are cooperating or not, HAVE FUN.

Have Jeep will travel. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,408 Posts
1. Beer on the planks isn't always the best idea, use in moderation.

2. Never gaff a fish you do not intend to keep.

3. A long and heavy shock leader is great for handlining up large fish and getting them under control near the pier.

4. Fishing in a thunderstorm is a quick way to die young. I nearly learned the hard way this summer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
337 Posts
Hook Hone

Always have a hook hone available. How many times have you missed a big run...only because you didn' t have a sharp hook. :mad:

todd
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,276 Posts
I'm not an old hand at fishing, but I've fished piers since I was 6 and I've seen people do things I thought would never work and they ended up the only ones catching fish. Here are some of these, plus tips from true old hands.

1) If you own a cast net or know someone who has fresh finger mullet, get some. cut off the head and slice the fish in half straight down the spine. One of these mullet sides used on a fish-finder or Carolina rig is sure to catch any blue in the area.

2) During a spot run, don't waste tons of money for bag after bag of bloodworms. Carry a pack of small plastic worms in your box, cut them into pieces and use them. They cost less, last longer, and catch just as many spot as bloodworms.

3) Get a cast net and learn to use it well. I got one two years ago and now I catch my own mullet, shrimp and menhaden. A good cast net will pay for itself many times over.

4) Learn to make your own rigs. This goes for all fishermen, not just king men, who should already know how to make your own rigs. This not only saves money, a bottom rig made with the same mono as your reel will catch more fish.

5) Doodlebug rigs murder bluefish. Always have some handy.

6) For night fishing, buy some mini-Glow Sticks and hang them from the tip of your rod after the cast. They do not interfere with the rod and they make strikes easier to see.

7) For night shark fishing, buy some mini-Glow Sticks and attach them to the line near the bait. It will attract more sharks.

8) Another sharking tip. Buy an old blender at a garage sale or flea market. Get a bunch of fresh fish, cut off the heads and put them in the blender with some water and a little oil(preferably menhaden oil). Pour the mixture in a seal-able bucket(small, 1 gallon or so) and put the heads in. You can then use the heads for bait and the marinate for a chum slick.

9) Unless you are not into big fish, always have a large rig with you. Then if you catch a fish too small for the table you can throw it out as bait and try for one for the trophy room.

11) There, now mine's not a top-ten list. :D. Never be afraid to ask for advice. Unless you are bottom-fishing off of Cherry Grove Pier, there is always someone who will help you and maybe even teach you a new and better technique(did I spell that right?).

Great times and great fish,

Evan
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,208 Posts
f'nF2,

... just one thing, something never to forget - GO FISH !

`bucket

... regarding an actual tip once you have remembered the first and biggest tip you'll ever get ... I like your large bait concept :cool: But don't forget to check/change said large bait every ~ 15 mins, keep that thing fresh as well as big :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
1. Take a kid fishing. There's nothing like seeing a kid light when he hook a fish. If you don't have kids yourself to take along with you there are plenty of kids that either don't have anyone to take them or the families can't afford to tackel and other expenses that come along with fishing. I usually dedicate 3-4 trips a year to taking kids in the area fishing off the piers that have never been.

2. If you're going to take a nap or not be watching your rod while fishing make sure you either pull it up or let someone know where you are going to be and ask if they will keep an eye on it for you. When I start my king fishing off the piers I usually work at 12 hour day then leave right from work and head to the beach to spend another 15-16 hours out there so I usually end up napping for a bit before the 2 hour trip home :D

3. Be safe no matter where you are fishing. Make sure you know who's around you when casting, taking an 8oz sinker or a gotcha plug or a king anchor in the head isn't fun. Also make sure you know the regulations for the area you are fishing.

4. Always be nice and curteouse(sp?) to the other fisherpeople around you. If everyone works together great things can happen :D I've seen what I thought would be impossable happen many times out king fishing. all the spots taken up (52) meaning there were 104 rods in the water at any given time and we still managed to land 8 kings with no tangles.

5. Don't be affraid to ask questions while you're out fishing and share the knowledge you've learned with others. When I first moved to NC and started fishing the piers I watched the organised chaos going on at the ends of the piers (king fishing) and it always seemed overwhelming with all the lines, rigs, anchors, gaffs, pier carts, baits, grumpy old men complaining someone took their lucky spot that morning. I finally decided to purchase some more equipment and head to the pier, asked one of the "Pier Gods" that was out there fishing if he would mind showing me how everything was to be set up. He first started by showing me all the do's and don'ts of setting your anchor rod, then putting out the bait and putting it all together. After everything was setup he then showed me how to tie my own rigs and make my own release clips ect. That day I watched two bluefish come up and eat my bait and have been hooked ever since :D Oh yeah and I also made quite a few lifelong friends out on the end of the pier.

6. For those that have families, try to get them involved. My wife dosen't like to fish but loves the beach so when she comes down with me the first half of the day is spent fishing while the other half is spent walking the beach, sun bathing (which I will never understand) and swimming.

Tight Lines


Tim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,826 Posts
Great stuff guys

Like DD says, Never stop learning new stuff.
Like Cdog says, always have a metal rod. I was bait fishing a bunch of years ago and saw a Sailfish in the inside slough in Kitty Hawk. I missed the chance 'cause I didn't have anything to throw at it.
And like the rest say, Take your kids fishing, sharpen your hooks, Go Fishing.

My tip, Don't fish over the fish. You will be suprised at what you catch at your feet, right on the dropoff. Oh, and if you aren't going to eat it, or use it for bait, THROW it back unharmed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,826 Posts
Well KFM23 is right , they are deadly on the Blues.
They are an Outer Banks thing. It consists of a small head and some Bucktail and two hooks, Man that is a crappy discription but I don't know what else to say. The head floats and moves with the current.
You can get'em at most Outer Banks tackle shops. Sea Striker makes the best ones, but get 'em while you can, Sea Striker has taken them out of production.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,336 Posts
Jetty Tips

1. NEVER go on the jetty at night without taking some precautions:

- Fish the jetty area during the daytime during all tide changes to become familiar with the structure, currents, and tidal flow.

- Make sure you have Korkers on the jetty and a PRF before you attempt any crazy idea to fish at the tip.

- When fishing at night, do not use a large light or headlight. If you have a headlight, take it off your head and hang it around your neck. This directs the light downward where you need it.

- Do not wear chest waders or hip waders while fishing the jetty. If you fall in, you either go downcurrent or out to sea.

- Take only the gear you need in a hip box.

2. Take some time to learn how to make up your own rigs. This will same money and guarantee that your rigs are made with the finest material possible.

3. Cut down on all terminal tackle (swivels, snaps, FF, etc). Less terminal gear=more sensitivity and more bite detection.

4. Learn new spots every year. We have so many Hotspots listed on this site - take the time to learn new ones.

5. Learn to relax and enjoy the environment where you are

6. Most important - Share what you know with others. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,263 Posts
Pier and other tips

Wow these are some great tips. Here are some of mine. Check your guides for nicks or wear and tear. If you're breaking off for no reason, that may be the cause. Make your own high/low bottom rigs. It's cheaper and of higher quality. Also what Wilbur said about fishing on close also works on piers. Many times piers are the only structure for miles for fish to hide at. At the end of a trip and you have a lot of left over bait, give it to another angler unless you can use it on your next trip. Always offer to help someone net or land their fish. You can make a lot of new friends that way. Never abuse any species regardless if they are trash fish. Last but not least, fish hard and often :D .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
Doodlebugs aka Hatteras baitbugs. As Wilber said 1” flat-faced round cork body with a long-shanked hook running through the middle tied with deer hair and a stinger, second hook with the eye thru the 1st. Think Sea Striker makes a line of them. You add a strip of mullet or other cut bait thru the two hooks and short striking blues get caught on the stinger hook. Red/white is always good & I like to use green for off-color water. Always thought they be great to catch blues for pin rigging for kings. Over the years, either my buddies or I have caught bluefish, flounder, specks, gray trout, stripers, puppy drum, Spanish, black drum and even a 36# jack cravalle on them

Added a pair of cheap chicken processor castoff scissors to my tools I keep in or by the bait cooler. Better than a knife IMO for cutting strips for flounder or for DoodleBugs.

For the bead that I use between the weight slider (2/0 swivel & a McMahon snap) and the hook leader swivel, have been using a bead with a large diameter hole so the bead encases the swivel knot rather than jamming into it. Can get about 50 for a buck or so at a craft store.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
801 Posts
if you don't get to fish every day-or week-when you hit the beach just tie on whatever weight you will be using. make several casts-short, little longer, then a long smooth cast. this will get the "memory" out of the line(esp. with andi or the other hard mono's) and prevent having the initial professional overrun and will also get your timing back.
charlie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,075 Posts
Tips

Drink lots of water both before and during fishing on those hot sunny days..also don't forget to drink lots of water on those cold days(you still perspire due to the clothing layers) and do't forget that sun screen..last but not least..take a kid fishing..your wife will appreciate it and the kid will have a blast!:)
 
1 - 20 of 43 Posts
Top