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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Pick a night when high tide is between 8-11 PM and the wind is blowing SW. This wind pattern will be predominant this time of year.

Get there right before sunset.

You must be able to cast very far. If you can't cast far you will only get frustrated.

Use a long spool reel with line spooled all the way to the edge and long rod (at least 7' 6") for maximum casting distance. Shimano Spheros work well for maximum casting distance. For maximum distance, use ultra thin line such as magna thin, super strength, etc. The smaller the diameter of line the longer the cast (simple physics of friction). Ultra thin 16# is equivalent to 12# standard stren. This is what I recommend. With this you will need at least 3 ounce sinkers and most of the time 4 ounces.

If you don't normally spool all the way to the edge because you are cheap or your spool has excess capacity, use this simple trick.

Get the cheapest line possible and spool the first 1/3 or so with it. Put a scotch tape over this. Then spool the remainder with good quality line. The average fishermen will never use more than the first 100 yards of a line, but in your case you should have at least 175 yards. Not that you will use it all, but just in case something huge pulls your drag.

Bring bloodworm and crab (not peeler).

Go to the first sink on the right side of pier and find a spot either left or right of sink. Usually there are some folks who leave for the night. On weekends this may be tough so you may want to get there earlier for the optimum spot.

Use bottom rig with 1 to 3 hook (trust me on this). Cast straight as far as you can. If you can't throw far you will get hung up left and right wasting valuable time rigging and rerigging.

Use bloodworms first and hope to catch a spot or two. If spot fishing is fast and furious and you really like spot like I do, continue to catch spot because they can be gone quickly.

Immediately use spot if you have 2 rods (cut very small for maximum casting distance; big bait leads to greater drag or wind resistance cutting down on casting distance) as there is a good possibility that you will catch some nice sized trout, huge croakers, very good possibility of stripers (which you will surely throw back even though there will be a temptation to keep since the spot light will be on you), blues and even flounders. I've also caught some monster eels during the summer.

Spots are more predominant before the high tide. Croakers are more predominant after the high tide. When croakers are biting well then all of sudden stops biting, there is a good possibility of some other predators lurking around such as stripers or blues. Pay attention. I do not believe I ever caught a skate or sting ray in this spot probably due to the structure that is there. I have caught some monster eels, however. One night a school of blues came by and I had to start throwing a spoon. I actually loaned one to a guy next to me and we must have caught 15 or so blues.

Many a summer night when the fishing was slow or most folks were catching tiny fish, I caught monsters using my secret and I have never had a truly bad night of fishing. Pretty soon, I would attract a crowd and they would come right next to me. They would start to cast and get hung up left and right because most could not throw as far. There is a cable that runs through there. I avoid the weekend during the summer because of this.

The key is being able to cast very far. I've caught cooler full of fish in less than 3 hours or so, but most of the time fishing cools off after 11:00 so realistically you only have 3 hours of prime fishing. Be prepared for fast rigging and rerigging. Its all about the structure. One night, another gentleman, who also knew the secret and I (both straight and long casters) caught over 10 2 pound plus trout in less than 30 minutes. This man actually had an assembly line where his wife would bait and unhook the fish from his line so that he never missed a beat. He is the one who turned me on to using hard crabs for big trout. Peelers will break off line when casting very far. I also find that spot work well for trout.

For the secret, you must be able to cast far. If you can't it is most likely your equipment and not your ability. With the right equipment and equipment set-up and of course practice, you can cast far.

The spot also works during other tides, but for maximum opportunity to catch a wider selection of fish and not be overloaded with croakers (my least favorite after toad fish) finding high tide from 8-11 PM is best.

I am telling the secret because, I have oter secret spots.

Maybe next time, I will share catching big flounders on the Seagull Pier. The trick is getting the big guy up. How can you do this with out an aid of a net? Where there is a will, there is a way.
 

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Excellent post!

Maybe one day when I'm ready to hit a crowded pier I'll try it. I much prefer fishing from shore but, I'm willing to try this on a week night when there aren't as many people around.

For me, fishing is not enjoyable elbow to elbow, whether on a pier, beach or stream. I like it more solitary. To each his own.

But, thanks for the advice. It can probably be used at other places as well.

Keep 'em tight...
 

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Thanks for the info I'm heading south in the begining of Aug and I
might have to spend a night at the pier while passing through.
 

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you better watch out for those flyn hooks CDOG might look like them boys goin after JAWS out there in them boats :eek:
 

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Hey Cdog maybe some day I will be able to cast a 7'6" rode the distance but my rode only holds a little bit of line after I cast it I might get spooled… Man I want to be able to hang with those end crowed people can anyone give me some more tips on how to cast..;)
 

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Very good thread...

Seagull is a fun spot. I've spent plenty of time getting skunked but also caught plenty of nice fish from there. I even got ahold of my first cobia there back in the 80's when I was a kid (okay, so the guy who hooked up got tired and handed me his rod so I could fight it for awhile :p ).

My favorite hole there is on the lefthand corner where the trash can is. Go to that back corner and toss out. There's a great hole out there that always holds panfish.
 

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Please post your suggestions on how to catch big flounder! A guy who was shopping in the fishing section of Walmart told me the tie my bate, i.e. Spot and or squid to the hook with a few rounds of thread. Also what is the best way/place to hook minnows. I tried through the eyes on Sunday...but that only resulted fish decapitating them and leaving the head on my hook.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
It is blue crab. When you cast far it is very important to have a bait that holds well. Baits like shrimp and peeler do not hold very well just from the force of the long cast. When you throw far you want to make sure bait is on hook. To reel in your line after a long cast takes more time and if you constantly cast long and reel in after a short time, you wastes valuable time. It's not good when you are not sure if bait is on hook when the fish is biting which can also eat into productivity.

Common sense decides how crab should be on hook. Take small pieces of crab just like you would when you get pieces to eat. Most of us tear small pieces and try to expose maximum meat. Fish want the meat too. Just make sure you leave some strong shell to put a hook through the shell which will be secure on the hook even after a long throw.

Use smaller bait size since big baits add drag when you throw which can reduce casting distance by 25-50%.

CCC
 

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Ahhh. The ever elusive "Long Cast". :( Some of us are too old for that, so take this tip from the Fat Man with the Blue Wagon:

Rig up your long caster with a weight. Only.

Heave that sucker as far as you possibly can - it will probably be further than normal because there's no extra baggage like bait.

Rig up a separate piece of line with a snap swivel on one end and your bait on the other. Weight it down a little if you want it to go to the bottom, especially if you are casting "up" current.

Clip the bait line onto the anchor line, stand the rod up, and watch the bait slide outta sight. You already know where it's going.

This rigging isn't as sensitive as others, but it will get you distance. And, if the fish is big enough, who cares about sensitivities anyway? You'll still see the rod jumping.

Oh. BTW. Not recommended if using live eels. LOL. Know that from personal experience when that sucker managed to twist himself up and around the main line and get "hung" midway from the pier to the water line. I still haven't figured out exactly how he managed to do that, but I do know I had to start all over.

The only other technique that I've found that works better is to use my boat. :D
 
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