Pier and Surf Forum banner
1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So...this site is all about fishing but nobody wants to show their successes. No pics. Used to be that the old timers trained the newbys. Now it seems to be everyone for themselves. (Not naming names here) From experience I have seen the NC fishery decline to the point where I don't bother to even try anymore. Bluefish blitz? what is that? You folks that live on the coast can take advantage of extra time fishing but there are a lot of people who come here to fish based on the history. The least you can do is to encourage these folks when they decide to spend the money to come here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
So...this site is all about fishing but nobody wants to show their successes. No pics. Used to be that the old timers trained the newbys. Now it seems to be everyone for themselves. (Not naming names here) From experience I have seen the NC fishery decline to the point where I don't bother to even try anymore. Bluefish blitz? what is that? You folks that live on the coast can take advantage of extra time fishing but there are a lot of people who come here to fish based on the history. The least you can do is to encourage these folks when they decide to spend the money to come here.
Ok, you go first. Show some pics and offer some tips and encouragement.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
756 Posts
Dast - Sharing by Example is a good way to get involved in the forum.
Personally, and as a moderator for several of this companies forums, we like to see Introductions. Tell us a little about yourself. What equipment you have, what species do you like to target. Are you a Pier fisherman, Beach Walker or Beach Buggy enthusiast ?? And, not necesssarily for the new members. But, for some of us older members that need to update their information. For me, I started off in the Outer Banks with a '77 Chevy K5 Blazer. Then, moved to Orlando, where the whole fishing thing changed drastically. And now, with age and its tribulations setting in, I can only get out on the piers occassionally until I get some body parts fixed. Then, it'll be back to the Big Surf with the heavy tackle.

My wife often goes pier fishing with her cronies at Sebastian without me and I can keep track of her with the piercam.
Water Cloud Sky Lake Body of water
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Ok, I'll play.

I started visiting the OBX with my wife's family in the mid '70s and we'd usually stay in Kitty Hawk or points north. They bought a lot and built a beach house in Southern Shores in '80 and living in the DC area I could get down there for long weekends and vacations many times throughout the year. My FIL had some surf gear, although he was no longer was interested, I took it out on the beach one day and cast Hopkins lures, and on my first trip I hooked into a tailor bluefish, around 2 lbs. I don't know who was hooked harder, me or that fish. Not long after that I learned the delights of the dear old Kitty Hawk pier, and from that point on for all intents and purposes whenever my wife and I went down there she became a fishing widow. So for me, surf fishing has and always will = OBX, and I've fished there from Duck to Hatteras. I don't get down there as much any more, but I try to at least do a couple of fishing trips a year

For some reason I never wanted to get into the big rig fishing - the guys at the end of the pier or on the beach casting out to the edge of the continental shelf looking for kraken, I was always perfectly happy working the first couple of sloughs lure fishing for blues, trout, flounder, spanish, and pups, or bait fishing for spot, croaker, and kingfish. And I still prefer that today.

My gear hasn't changed much over the years, 2500 - 4000 series reels, typically Daiwa or Penn, and 7' - 8' 1/2 - 3 rods for the pier or 10' 1-4 rods for the surf, again Daiwa or Penn. I still use some of the old rigs, like double bucktails for trout or Hopkins and Kastmaster spoons, Gotcha jigs... but I also like some of the epoxy coated Stingsilvers for castability and action in the water. Nowadays I exclusively use circle hooks for bait, and Fishbites are fast becoming a must-have in my tackle box, as they've saved some fishing days when all else failed.

But as others have noted, fishing has changed. The seasonal migration patterns are different, species appear to be either declining or increasing, and the ratio of catching to fishing seems to be lowering quite a bit. I think surf fishing is becoming more difficult and I'm not sure what that ultimately means for my favorite pastime.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,804 Posts
When I started fishing there was no internet.

It took a great deal of time for me going out to the end of OBX piers for me to be even acknowledged by the older fellas at the end to pier. A couple fellas who were real old, like in their mid-forties or so, took pity on my young self after laughing at my struggles and showed me how to do things like a haywire twist, how to cast a heaver, how to pee off the downwind corner of the T. How to stay cool and clean by dumping 5 gallon bait buckets of ocean water over your head. How to smoke weed on the downwind side of the pier, without causing enough of a problem that some well meaning person would report you to the front desk of the pier.

Back then you could sell Kings and Cobia to the restaurants in Nags Head. $2.00 a pound for Kings back in the early 1980s. So if Angler A is in Competition with Angler B for money to support a bad fishing habit, there was always some controversy at the end of the pier.

When I got more adept at King Fishing I and some of the other King Fishermen, would help those who showed interest. It is easy to help the enthusiastic.

Those who paid the $3.00 to come out to the end of the pier and thought that their $3.00 entitled them to a guided trip, and were rude and ungrateful....well those kind of fellas got the training they earned......

With the internet it seems like people complain if someone does not post a picture filled tutorial if they show up and and ask how do I tell if this is a deep hole, or a shadow of a cloud when I step out in front of the cottage I rented and walk straight due east.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I appreciate the responses, especially those who have experienced the same as me. Back in the 80's blue fish blitzes were common. David Duel caught a 94 pound drum. Trout were seen beaching themselves to get away from the blues. Chopper blues were common and, in my opinion, great eating. These days I see fewer catches of smaller fish. Flounder are now pretty much off limits. The last two times I bothered fishing with my children (now in their 30's) more times than not the fishing was poor to none. I have quit surf fishing for the foreseeable future. I would post a pic of my last trip to the OBX where my son and I fished a place on the north side of Oregon Inlet (which is gone now) about 6 years ago but I cannot find them. Seems a shame that the whole fishery seems to be depleted.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
756 Posts
So...this site is all about fishing but nobody wants to show their successes. No pics.
you sort of answered your own question of why there are not many pictures with the posts.
I too would like to see photos of past excursions as I remember how OBX used to be back in the early '70s. And in Florida, Titusville and New Smyrna Beach we could ride from the North end all the way down to Cape Canaveral and actually camp right on the beach in a tent with a bonfire. I worked for the Cape Canaveral Wildlife Refuge (maintenance div.) for a year and it broke my heart to actually walk the places that we used to cross over with my dad's 4x4 truck. My mother caught her biggest fish ever there. A huge 30 pound Red Bass on a flimsy fresh water bass rod and we don't know the test of the line. She walked it up and down the beach until finally a wave brought the fish in and 4 people jumped on it. (1958).
Probably all "shoreline" states are suffering the same demise up and down the Eastern Seaboard.

These photos were in Titusville, FL (Playalinda Beach) 2019. Notice that my PVC rod holders are yellow with a red top ?? Because stupid tourists walking the beach with their stupid cell phone stuck in their stupid faces actually walk right into them. . . The Caution Yellow helped "a little". The red top is the "coupling" fitting that provides some strength to the top of the tube when setting it with a rubber mallet - and some protection to the reel base.
Water Sky Shorts Beach People on beach

Water Shorts Natural environment Beach Coastal and oceanic landforms
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
So...this site is all about fishing but nobody wants to show their successes. No pics. Used to be that the old timers trained the newbys. Now it seems to be everyone for themselves. (Not naming names here) From experience I have seen the NC fishery decline to the point where I don't bother to even try anymore. Bluefish blitz? what is that? You folks that live on the coast can take advantage of extra time fishing but there are a lot of people who come here to fish based on the history. The least you can do is to encourage these folks when they decide to spend the money to come here.
Well I will agree with you on the fishing decline. Our fisheries commission is owned by the commercial industry and until we get a governor willing to use political capitol to fix it we continue on our path to destruction. Personally, I am not much on pictures but will offer advice occasionally........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Chopper blues were common and, in my opinion, great eating.
The smaller blues up to a few of pounds are just like any other ocean panfish to me, and don't really require any special handling other than cook them the same way you would a trout, spanish, or whiting/mullet. They're excellent eating as they are.

For larger blues (choppers/slammer/whatever people call them now) I like to bleed them right away, but they last all day on ice. The flesh is oilier, but no more so than king mackerel, IMO, and lends itself well to marinade and grilling.

I've fished with folks who considered them trash fish, and gladly took them off their hands.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
If you want to live vicariously thru those of us on the coast then I know there are plenty of pics in the VA regioanal section where we let each other know whats been caught or not. As for pictures of what use to be that is not helpful. I can recall waking up to shower for school and dad had a bluefish in the tub touching the ends tail to nose with the fireball rig still attached. That is a cool pic but does not teach me anything. asking questions and soaking in the educational replies is how i have learned. I have gone from store bought gear to tieing my own and from hand me down gear to just recently purchasing the new Penn Squall based on info from the guys that have been arouond for a while. (sweet casting just like the experienced guys said; thanks for the info!!). I have found plenty of sharing of knowledge that has increased my catching. Some knowledge needs not to be repeated when it is already there for the taking in the bible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,804 Posts
Drum fishing is great compared with back in the Day, but if I were to say anything but Secret Spot I will get reamed by my Drum fishing Friends who live on the beach.

The Following all are just a memory of what it was like:

King Mackerel
Spanish Mackerel
Grey Trout
Striped Bass
Amberjack
Jack Crevalle
Norfolk Spot

Big Duskies and Giant Summertime Hammerheads that lived all summer long at the OBX piers are gone, perhaps forever. Summer time after dusk on the piers if you wanted more after spending all day pin rigging.... you would chuck a bait out with a Heaver and then have some Monster Post Spawn Hammer smoke your ABU 9000 and take all the line in the first run. Seen a 10 Foot Hammer come into the pin rigs and eat 8 baits at the same time, frothing the whole end of the T with white water from his tail. See a few Hammers now in the winter coming down the slough at Ramp 44 eating Flounders and scaring any wading fishermen back onto dry sand, but none in the Summer like it was. The Hammers had names George was the Hammer that lived at Nags Head and Old Tom was the Rodanthe Hammer.
The would catch Tiger Sharks on old Jennettes Pier. Not too many Tigers these days in the OBX surf these days.

Cobia are still holding their own but the boats equipped with towers have multiplied from just a few into the hundreds


I remember a week back in the Day in the Spring where hundreds of 2-4 pound Flounder were like committing mass suicide in the Hook where you cannot drive anymore. Fifty Flounders every hour of daylight being caught by perhaps Fifty people throwing live bait or slow rolling Flounder Belly strips. I built a Fish Trap and would pick up about 50 mud minnows every afternoon for the Red Headed Fella and me to fish after work. The Flounder came in waves, it was too shallow for a Trawler, so it was just the Recs loading up. Forget what the limit was in those days but coolers were slam full.

I have only really been a Drum fisherman for the last thirty years. Glad I was there in the 70's and 80's when it was going off for the Kings and the Big Spanish. Even Today if I walk out on an OBX pier during pin rigging time one or two of the fellas recognize me from the days when I spent every fishable Summer's day out on the end of an OBX T.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
I have seen the blue blizz at fort macon last year 2021 I forget which month. Which sucks because now I think you can only keep what 3 blues. That day I must have caught at least 30+ blues with a spoon. They were not the phatties I remember like at point look out in MD but it was exciting . Cast out as far as you can let hit bottom and reel in jigging.. It was a guaranteed fish on..... So exciting .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
So...this site is all about fishing but nobody wants to show their successes. No pics. Used to be that the old timers trained the newbys. Now it seems to be everyone for themselves. (Not naming names here) From experience I have seen the NC fishery decline to the point where I don't bother to even try anymore. Bluefish blitz? what is that? You folks that live on the coast can take advantage of extra time fishing but there are a lot of people who come here to fish based on the history. The least you can do is to encourage these folks when they decide to spend the money to come here.
Well I will agree with you on the fishing decline. Our fisheries commission is owned by the commercial industry and until we get a governor willing to use political capitol to fix it we continue on our path to destruction. Personally, I am not much on pictures but will offer advice occasionally........
You are so correct. I have been fishing the Outer Banks since the late 1970 s . Fantastic fishing up until till early 1980 s. As I have a house south of Buxton I spent many hours on the beach. I have seen chopper blue fish chase trout onto the beach several times .In the fall schools of bunker ,almost as large as football fields , would be going down the beach and jumbo blues right in the middle of them . Drum would be there sucking down the scraps. Then commercial fishermen hired spotter planes to locate schools of bunker. Large trawlers out of Wanchees and Wilmington would come in trawling with nets . Very few bunker were able to escape. These bunker were sold for 3 cent a pound for fertilizer . Next morning large dead drum would wash up on beach that drown in the nets. Tackle stores in Frisco ,Buxton , Avon and so forth would tell rec. fishermen that bunker didn't count .Bunker did count to fish of prey. In the mid 1980s the government started selling sonar , radar , and every else to commercial fishermen for pennys on the the dollar. Equipment left over Vietnam War. I pretty much gave up on fishing the ocean side toward the late 1980s. I still walk the beach , with my dog, starting from old Frisco peer . and toward walk toward the point. Surf fishermen are far and few between . coolers now hold beer instead of fish . Commercial fishermen now have taken almost all the skate. Restaurants skin the wings and take cookey cutters and make scallops out of them . Almost as good as scallops . Commercial fishermen now have turned to long lining ,I call trott lines , putting out miles of line with drop hooks , catching tons of dolphin . Go to marinas web sites and you will notice almost all dolphin are bailers. Not much bigger than a souped up bream . When you have 5 fishermen charter a boat for $2,000 or more and chances are each of them is lucky to reel in just a few dolphin. I have said ikt before and I say it again , forget surf fishing along Outer Banks . Get a 17' /18' open fishing skiff and fish near the inlet or creeks . You have to go where the inshore go . Go down to a marina , early , and follow them out. If you are on southern part of Hatteras go to a place like Hatteras Harbor Marina . These people are very honest and try to put tackle that you don't need like these tackle stores .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
You are so correct. I have been fishing the Outer Banks since the late 1970 s . Fantastic fishing up until till early 1980 s. As I have a house south of Buxton I spent many hours on the beach. I have seen chopper blue fish chase trout onto the beach several times .In the fall schools of bunker ,almost as large as football fields , would be going down the beach and jumbo blues right in the middle of them . Drum would be there sucking down the scraps. Then commercial fishermen hired spotter planes to locate schools of bunker. Large trawlers out of Wanchees and Wilmington would come in trawling with nets . Very few bunker were able to escape. These bunker were sold for 3 cent a pound for fertilizer . Next morning large dead drum would wash up on beach that drown in the nets. Tackle stores in Frisco ,Buxton , Avon and so forth would tell rec. fishermen that bunker didn't count .Bunker did count to fish of prey. In the mid 1980s the government started selling sonar , radar , and every else to commercial fishermen for pennys on the the dollar. Equipment left over Vietnam War. I pretty much gave up on fishing the ocean side toward the late 1980s. I still walk the beach , with my dog, starting from old Frisco peer . and toward walk toward the point. Surf fishermen are far and few between . coolers now hold beer instead of fish . Commercial fishermen now have taken almost all the skate. Restaurants skin the wings and take cookey cutters and make scallops out of them . Almost as good as scallops . Commercial fishermen now have turned to long lining ,I call trott lines , putting out miles of line with drop hooks , catching tons of dolphin . Go to marinas web sites and you will notice almost all dolphin are bailers. Not much bigger than a souped up bream . When you have 5 fishermen charter a boat for $2,000 or more and chances are each of them is lucky to reel in just a few dolphin. I have said ikt before and I say it again , forget surf fishing along Outer Banks . Get a 17' /18' open fishing skiff and fish near the inlet or creeks . You have to go where the inshore go . Go down to a marina , early , and follow them out. If you are on southern part of Hatteras go to a place like Hatteras Harbor Marina . These people are very honest and try to put tackle that you don't need like these tackle stores .
that is simply telling it like it is..........and my problem is I have surf fished for 50 years. I know it sucks and pretty much know what is going to happen when I go. But like a addict I love it, its that simple. As time goes forward the new generation will not stay if there are no results. When the fishing shops take the hit and eventually the commercial fisherman have completely destroyed the stocks MAYBE something will be done. Pretty much like our national debt of 31 trillion. it does not stop until we go insolvent......and not a second before. I told my wife its time to put a boat on island or just stop going........and even at that the cost are not worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
that is simply telling it like it is..........and my problem is I have surf fished for 50 years. I know it sucks and pretty much know what is going to happen when I go. But like a addict I love it, its that simple. As time goes forward the new generation will not stay if there are no results. When the fishing shops take the hit and eventually the commercial fisherman have completely destroyed the stocks MAYBE something will be done. Pretty much like our national debt of 31 trillion. it does not stop until we go insolvent......and not a second before. I told my wife its time to put a boat on island or just stop going........and even at that the cost are not worth it.
For years the tackle shops have been the eyes and ears for commercial fishermen. Rec fishermen would go in tackle stores and brag about the fish they were catching . Tackle shops would then call the commercial boys and tell them where the fish were. Most all the locals are intertwined and they really stick together . Before the old Frisco pier was torn down there was a hole where trout would pool up in and winter.late fall and winter. In the evening the sport fishermen would get so excited that they would head to the nearest tackle shop and tell them about all the fish in that area. Tackle store employees would then call the commercial boys and pass on the info. Early the next morning before sun up the net boats would drag those holes . The rec fishermen would go back to that tackle store all down and out . No fish to be had . Tackle stores would then tell them to buy one of their superdooper lures . They had heard water quality had changed and needed a different color.I was there and I have seen it year after year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
So the commercial boats hang around the tackle shops for advice on where to fish from tourists in the winter that found a hole somewhere that had some trout.. ok. Been awhile but the jerk is back-somebody has to do it. Any pics of this super dooper lure i need one my lures all suck
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top