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Hello Everyone,

I don't get to fish saltwater much so I don't want to buy new reels just for saltwater. I do have a Shimano Cardiff 300 and an Abu Garcia C3. Are these two reels OK to use in saltwater? I mainly just fish inshore.

Also, I picked up a Penn saltwater baitcaster but unlike fresh water baitcaster, it doesn't seem to have a brake system or spool control knob. Are these kind of reels made for casting too or is it just for trolling/dropping straight down?

Thanks everyone.
 

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I have several ABU reels I use in salt & like oden has stated, they've been fine. Just be sure you rinse the salt off of them & clean them a couple times a year if you use them a lot. Only Shimano reel I have is a Calcutta so can't really comment on the Cardiff as I don't know much about them. Shimano & ABU both make very good reels, but it's like the Ford or Chevy or Chrysler debate, and everyone has their likes & dislikes.

Penns are great, but really depends on what reels you have. Some models are better for casting than others. If you have an early model, some of even the best casting reels had no brake system, so you had to have a very educated thumb. Old School! :D

I also have several Penn's but primarily use them for bottom fishing or trolling.
 

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Man just follow some safety and precautionary measures and adopt any fishing reel for saltwater fishing.
This ingraphic was quite helpful...you can also take advantage
View attachment 69542
It’s recommended to not wash reels anymore. It drives salt and sand deeper into the reel and does nothing for salt and sand already stuck in grease or oil. Better to just service them more frequently or when needed. Probably won’t hurt the average pier users gear too much though.
 

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It’s recommended to not wash reels anymore. It drives salt and sand deeper into the reel and does nothing for salt and sand already stuck in grease or oil. Better to just service them more frequently or when needed. Probably won’t hurt the average pier users gear too much though.
You should always rinse your reels and rods with fresh water. You don't use a hard spray, just a gentle wash . Who ever said don't wash your reels is nuts. Do it right and you won't get sand in the reel, besides , try not to drop reel in sand so much. Julietangler has it down pat. I have reels from when I was a kid, I still have them because I clean them and maintain them well. Tight lines.
 

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I agree with Julie, most modern reels are built such that a rinse with fresh water will dislodge salt and sand without driving it deeper into crevices, and even the older stuff lasts much longer with a rinse-off after each use. If you suspect sand got under any external components then it doesn't take a lot to disassemble and rinse/clean them, usually by merely taking off the spool.

I had an old Daiwa 4000 C surf spinning reel from the late '70s that lasted over 25 years with simple cleaning after each day on the beach. I retired it long before it was going to wear out otherwise. It was a reasonably robust reel but I would find them for sale in a lot worse condition than mine, usually corroded and pitted and gunked up, and likely because they lacked simple cleaning and maintenance.
 

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I have six or seven 40 year old 7000-8600-9000-10000 ABU's that spent 10 years on an OBX pier.
By 10 years I mean they were out on the end of the piers in the elements for 3650 full days or nights of fishing. After I was done fishing, I hosed them off with fresh water supplied by the Piers, unless it was raining or real cold i.e. late fall or winter fishing.

If Reels got dunked or sandy from beach fishing then I tried to wash them off too and then take apart and oil them.
If you wait too long, the bearings get rusted and ruined.
I just replaced several bad bearings on Daiwa SL series reels, these reels had been Point Washed and then not taken apart. Point washing is when you are out wading and a big wave comes along and dunks you and your gear.

A lot of time I would just bring the rod butts and reels into the shower at home and wash them off.

Not sure who recommends not rinsing salt water or salt deposits off your equipment, but this person does not live at the beach. No one living at the beach and still working has time to take every reel apart and oil after each outing, especially if you are King Fishing and have 4-5 rods you take out with you each morning.

Salt air on places like Hatteras is a cruel mist that envelopes everything after the sun goes down. When you see a broken down Beach Truck on Hatteras they invariably have a broken frame that rusts out right behind the cab, caused by Salt Mist dripping down and cutting-rusting the frame away. Think of the mist as a mean dew that kills everything made of steel. Salt Mist kills men's minds too.....causes Hatteras Island Disease, but that is another subject all together.
 

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A buddy just dropped off eight reels and five rods for me to fix / service / toss in parts bins yesterday. His kids "sort of" spray them off, but a lot of the issues so far are caused by NOT spraying them off and NEVER having lubed them. He received a sound thrashing. I have serviced, built and/or used hundreds of reels, including several hundred (that's right, I have about 640 at last count) of my own. Light spray as mentioned above, and a service now and again is way better than nothing. Even a wipe down with WD40 (not on line, and NOT as a lube) better than nothing. If you get Point washed, drop your reel in the sand etc., etc., expect that it needs a little more of a look than simple spray off, and act accordingly. Even a wallyworld tourist special deserves not to be abused, and I shake my head when I come by an International that appears to have been drug in gravel. Fish hard, by all means, but a little care goes a long way. Feed the horses first. My 0.02, time on water is too expensive and too hard to come by to get there and have equipment failure because it sat unmaintained. Good equipment is way too expensive to let slide, and cheaper equipment simply won't last without care. See Garbo's comments on Abu (favs of mine as well). Once a client starts paying to replace multiple Shimano bearings the light usually goes on, lol.
 
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