Pier and Surf Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've got an Akios S-Line 656 CTM, and the following tuning steps were taken over the course of 1.5 years. Of course, if the reel started backlashing, I'd stop and work on technique. By the time I moved on to the next tuning step, reel was nice and tame...

1. 4 magnets in (off), 2 brake blocks in, factory shielded steel ball bearings.
2. 4 magnets in (off), 1 brake block in, factory shielded steel ball bearings.
3. 2 magnets in (off), 1 brake block in, factory shielded steel ball bearings.
4. 2 magnets in (off), 1 brake block in, ceramic hybrid ABEC-7 ball bearings (dry, seals removed).

So what's next: get a speed bullet? Take out the remaining brake block?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
214 Posts
Do the cheapest thing first and see how you like it 🤷‍♂️ enjoy the tinkering aspect and become the guy with the knowledge when someone else asks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Sounds good - hard to argue with champion advice. I know enough not to obsess over this reel tuning stuff, but I haven't seen so much as a fluff-up in a long time and I feel like I'm leaving yards on the table at this point.

My take on centrifugal brakes vs. magnets:

Centrifugal Brakes come online a little earlier than magnets and offer better protection against the initial spool surge. After that surge, though, they can be too much.

Magnets, once they activate, are slightly more precise as far as automatically adjusting the braking power to the RPMs of the spool.. but, again, it takes a little more time for the magnetic field to break up the initial surge of the spool and start controlling it.

Are these statements accurate?
 

·
DISTANCE CASTING SPONSOR
Joined
·
3,336 Posts
Matt,

I look at braking as an overall package. Every caster is different (heck, every cast is different...lol) and each reel has its own personality based on individual tuning.

The way I see it, magnets are a primary or "hands on" control method. You can adjust and fine tune your cast with the mags and best of all you can adjust the setting when the wind changes from a light tailwind to a 20 mph Hatteras headwind... The brake blocks are more of a base control. Use the blocks to get your mags into the right control range for your cast. Does that make sense? In other words, too many brake blocks and the mags are never really able to provide the control you seek, even at minimum mags the reel is over-braked and will not fluff. On the other extreme (no brake blocks) The reel can be very fast and even at full mag unable to handle a cast into a headwind without fluff and zing-pow.....

And throw into that mix another big variable, bearings. Bearings and the oil you put in them have a huge effect on reel tuning. I cannot tell you how many guys have purchased reels from me and the very next question, "where can I get ceramic hybrid bearings to make this reel faster?? I saw it on YOUTUBE"!! I always try to talk them out of immediate bearing upgrades for a fishing reel. Then they ask (or sometimes state) "well YOU run ceramics, don't you??" The answer usually surprises them. No, in fishing reels I run factory stock bearings because I like to be in control of the reel, not vice versa.

So, tune in this order;
1) Make sure the reel is "set up" properly. Spool centered with just a hint of side to side play.
2) Both brake blocks installed.
3) Go to maximum mags.

Make multiple casts. The reel should be VERY docile in this configuration. Now, back off a couple of clicks on the mag and make another cast. Continue doing this until you either start to get a little fluff or you get to min mags. If you start to get fluff, the just add a couple clicks of mag and you are done!! If you get close to min mags and still no sign of fluff then remove ONE brake block. Turn the mags back up and start over. Typically, in this mag/brake block configuration most guys will find their "fluff point". Ideally this is somewhere mid to lower mid mag range. That gives you room to adjust up in a headwind. Remember, when you find that fluff point, add a couple clicks back toward max to get you in a fast but safe zone. If you still cannot make the reel fluff, recheck you spool for proper side to side play. If good then remove the spool, remove the bearings and clean them. Sometimes the factory get overzealous with lube and thus the bearings will be very slow. To clean, you can soak for an hour in lighter fluid, shaking on occasion or you can get some automotive brake/carb cleaner, put them on an old spindle (or chopstick) and spray the heck out of them. They are clean when they spin free. WEAR GLOVES AND SPRAY IN A WELL VENTILATED AREA. Spin the solvent out (canned spray air for keyboard cleaning works great) and let them dry. Add 1 or 2 drops per bearing of the oil that came with the reel and you are good to go. Too much oil will slow the bearing down. Remember, the reel will be FASTER now and you will have to add mags and possibly add brake blocks back to have control.

It is all about control.

That's all the typing my fingers have in them for now...lol

Tommy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I put the factory bearings back in and removed the last brake block. This required that I dial the two remaining magnets to 10 (0-13 Akios scale) to stop backlash late in the launch stage of the flight. Funny thing is I lost about 15 yards when I did 6 casts with this tuning (compared to safer previous tuning: factory bearings, 2 magnets at "0", 1 brake block).

It seems like the magnets alone are less effective for launch control, but are too strong for mid- to late-flight. Guess this is where in-flight mag adjusting comes in, but I hate the idea of getting into that.

Think I'll try cleaning and re-oiling the factory bearings and put the brake block back in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
Matt, Often these types of reels are shipped with excessive grease in the centrifugal system. Any grease is excessive.
Clean any grease from the brake drum, pins, and blocks. There should not be any grease internal to the brake block. This will give you better consistency in the braking.

I thought the 656 came with 3 magnets and not 4. You may want to try using 3 magnets with all three polarities being the same (up or down).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Now a new problem has emerged. I've taken out all the magnets except one, put in ABEC-7 ceramic hybrid ball bearings, one brake block, and now the brake block is getting really accelerated wear on it. The below photos are from just 5 casts (no sign of backlash, by the way)... from brand new to this. Everything inside looks fine and I even replaced the brake plate (centrifugal brake race/drum). Are the centrifugal brakes simply not meant to hold up at a certain RPM?
67218

67219
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
Sometimes the C clip that secures the brake support plate will come off, releasing the brake support plate. This can/does create a lot of damage.

Your spool shaft appears to be damaged. Has it always been like that or is it weird light reflections?

Is your pinion gear bronze or stainless steel?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
In the top picture it looks like the spool has been damaged. Check the edge of the spool next to the stud.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top