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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone use circle hooks along with fleas for the pompano? If so what size do you use?

Or do you guys like J hooks with the sand fleas?
 

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bigshark88
I use # 2 circle hooks along with fleas for the Pomp's . With the circle hooks I think they can get at the flea a little easier.
T<--->--<>Kozlow
 

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Thanks Koz, I am headed to Wal-Mart right now! I will try to rip it up wade fishing on Saturday. Hopefully I will be able to post pics.

I am new to circle hooks so sizes will always be helpful. :)
 

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bigshark88
Will be looking for the pics
Check your PM

T<--->--<>Lines
Kozlow
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Anyway gang- I just got back from Wal-Mart
I already own the usual grubs/jig heads for the trout as well as the DOA shrimp

At Wally-world tonight I picked up another classic gold weed-less spoon, an in-line gold spinner with a white plastic trailer, two Mirro-Lures (a red headed/white bodied “classic style” and a trout colored Top Dawg). I also got circle hooks in 2/0, 4/0 and 6/0. A pretty good haul!

Okay Kozlow, this will reveal my stupidity. What is the difference between #2 and 2/0 circle hooks? Another thing, I got Owner 2/0 “SSW” style hooks and now they do not look all that “circular” anymore! I think that I am jammed up with “J” hooks with offset eyes.

Anyway you look at it, I think I am geared up for some Reds and maybe some trout if the rain has not chased them all way off into the ocean. If all is dead, I will move from the “sweet” brown flats water to the salty bluer stuff to chase down the Macks and the Pomps. This Saturday is going to be a blast!

PM right back at ya Kozlow
 

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bigshark88

Courtesy of
Waldo "Double Treble" Tejera. Islamorada Sport Fishing Online contributing writer.

"What’s In a Hook?"

Have you ever stepped into a fishing tackle aisle in a store and found yourself confused or amazed at the variety of hooks available today? Well if you have don’t feel too bad because in reality its hard to really know or be familiar with every hook available out there today. What you need to know is what hooks are useful to the types of fishing we do here in the Keys. So then let’s look at the basics and unravel the mystery.

First we must understand the makings of a typical fishing hook. Hooks are principally classified into sizes. Hook sizes are from 1/0 (smallest) to over 12/0 (largest). When a hook size is stated without the /0 it is smaller than a 1/0 hook. These hooks become smaller as the number increases. These small hooks are used for catching bait and other small fish. Most hooks have an eye where fishing line attaches to and a straight section called the shank leading up to the curved point. At the point there may be a barb intended to keep the hook stuck in the fish’s mouth or wherever it sinks in to. Some hooks have no barbs to aid in quick release without harming the fish. Some fishermen intentionally remove these barbs when barbless hooks aren’t available. The hook point may be rounded or knife edge or even curved inside. Hooks are made of forged steel, stainless steel, nickel, and some other metallic materials. They’re usually colored bronzed (brown), chromed or silver, red, black, or grayish. Differences in eye styles, shank lengths, gap sizes, barbs, point, and color are what we must focus on to determine which hook we need.

Hook eyes can be straight, tapered, or needled. Most hook eyes are straight. Some hook eyes are easier to open to allow joining two hooks for rigging long baits such as ballyhoo. Tapered hooks are useful in aiding a hook embed itself easier in a fish’s mouth especially when fishing with dead or live natural baits. These hooks are also used when snelling is preferred where a special high strength knot is needed. Needled eyes are usually found in large, big game hooks where the eye is drilled in and not formed by bending the hook wire. This prevents the eye from opening under heavy stress as is encountered with very heavy fish. Some hook eyes include a split ring which is useful in live baiting where you want the hook to move freely. For most purposes straight eyed hooks are fine.

Shank length is an important factor in choosing a hook. If you will be live baiting or using any type of natural bait where a fish will have time to observe your offering, a small shank is indicated. Small shanks will allow you to embed the hook into cut bait and will also allow a live bait to swim freely. Short shanks are stealthier and will be less noticeable to fish. When fishing for toothy fish such as mackerel and barracuda, long shank hooks are useful if no wire will be used. A long shank will give you a measure of protection on break offs from these fish. It will also allow you to tie your line directly to a hook without wire thus improving your strike numbers. For larger toothed predators you might want to attach two hooks together or a short shanked hook with a wire leader.

Lighter hooks are generally better for live baiting. Thinner wire hooks weigh less and thus allow a live baitfish to swim freely. By the same token light wire hooks are easier bent by large fish. So ideally a high strength, light wire hook is excellent for live baiting. Heavier hooks with thicker wire can be used for trolling or for larger species.

Gap size is extremely important in selecting your hooks. Gap size should correlate with what type of fish you are targeting. For larger fish you’ll need a larger gap; smaller gaps for smaller fish. If a fish with a big lip bites on your bait but your hook’s gap is smaller than its lip, you’ll lose the fish because the hook will slip out of its mouth. A good rule is to match the hook gap to bait size.

Barbs and hook points are generally similar in most hooks. As stated before barbless hooks are useful in quick release of fish. Hook points should, of course, be sharp. Some hook points are knife-edged to improve penetration into the fish’s mouth. Laser sharp hooks have specially sharpened and extra strong hook points that will not bend or become dull. Hooks can be offset or straight pointed. Offset hooks are slightly bent at the curve where the barb is. This prevents a hook from coming out of a fish’s mouth before embedding itself. For live-baiting and dead-baiting offset hooks are generally better. Straight hooks are better for trolling where streamlining is important. These straight hook points are exposed and trolled baits swim more naturally. Circle hooks have inward points useful in preventing gut hooked fish. These hooks are especially good for bottom fishing where a fish will have the time to inhale the whole bait. When using these hooks you must allow a fish to hook itself and avoid setting it. Some live baiters also use these hooks for fishing catch and release species such as Tarpon and Sailfish. When a fish swallows a circle hook, its inward point will allow the hook to slip out of its stomach and it will only attach itself in the fish’s mouth.

Hook color, though perhaps not as important, is another variable we must consider. Most hooks are silver or chromed. Because they shine when under sunlight, they are more visible. If your bait is silver as a pilchard or ballyhoo, silver hooks are generally fine. Darker colored hooks are less visible under water. They do not reflect light and are perceived as stealthier. Many live baiters used short shanked, brown colored or coffee colored hooks for this reason. There are now red hooks in the market which are supposed to simulate a bleeding baitfish. Many stainless steel hooks are black and thus are not as visible. Stainless steel hooks while stronger and non-rusting, become a problem if lodged into the mouth of fish to be released. Steel hooks will rust out in time and will allow a fish to continue living if released with a hook in its mouth.

So now which hook to use? In general smaller hooks will generate more strikes. Use 1/0 to 3/0 short shanked hooks for whole live baitfish such as pilchards and sardines. For trolled baits used long shank hooks size 4/0 to 6/0. For big bottom fish try circle hooks in sizes 3/0 to 5/0. When using cut bait use small short shank hooks size 1/0 to 3/0. For live baiting use light wire, dark colored short shanked hooks. When using live shrimp it’s generally better to use 1/0 to 2/0 hooks through the horn. When using dead shrimp use long shank hooks and thread the hook through the shrimp.

Treble hooks are special three-pointed hooks useful in live baiting. These hooks will attach themselves a lot easier to a fish’s mouth. When a fish strikes a live bait it may be so quick that it may miss a normal hook’s single point; not so with a treble. They are often found in plugs for these reasons. Some fishermen frown on using trebles because they claim they are less sporting. Well I guess you can see by me boat’s name that I don’t fall into that group.

Hopefully next time you walk into that fishing tackle aisle, you’ll be prepared to make a quick hook selection for you fishing plans.

T<---->-<>Lines
Kozlow
 

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Give those circle hooks a try and you'll like them. Especially if you fish from a sandspike. Don't try to set the hook like you would a J hook, the circle is a self setting hook and if you have the rod in your hand, just lean back with the rod to set the hook. You will get mostly lip hook-ups.
The red colored hooks became popular last year but the color wears off fast in the sand.
Do all the radio and TV stations in Tallahassee still give hourly, hog and grain reports? :D
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hooks are principally classified into sizes. Hook sizes are from 1/0 (smallest) to over 12/0 (largest). When a hook size is stated without the /0 it is smaller than a 1/0 hook. These hooks become smaller as the number increases. These small hooks are used for catching bait and other small fish.
That is exactly what I needed. Once again Kozlow comes through with the information I require but am too dumb/lazy to figure out.

BentHook- I am pro circle hook and I started putting them on my fish-finder rigs late last summer. I think that they are pro-conversation (+conservation as well) and pro-beer-consumption so they rock in my book. Lots of lip hooked fish which have better than good chances of swimming off to bend someone else's rod another day. I just can't figure out hook sizes at all for some reason, the sizing is new to me and the above quote helped.

As for the Tallahassee joke, you are correct; I live in a small agrarian village of a town. I am a displaced NY/NJ resident so I guarantee that you can't make fun of this place more than I do. In fact the boredom of Tally is what made me re-focus on my fishing. They actually do break into classic rock tunes on the radio for NASCAR practice. If ever there was a sport that belonged on TV and not radio, it is NASCAR.

The other hook question that I have is this: I have a buddy who says that if a fish breaks your leader and swims of with your circle hook in its lip, that it is not the end of the world. He claims that the hook will "rust out" after a while in salty conditions. Is this the case? And if it is, which hook colors would facilitate rusting out? I imagine that a stainless hook would stick around longer.
 

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bigshark88

"Stainless steel, the dominant material in rigging or hook's , is susceptible to its own special form of decay: crevice corrosion, also known as oxygen starvation. Stainless steel contains significant amounts of chromium. When exposed to the atmosphere the surface oxidizes slightly and a thin film of chromium oxide forms, preventing any further oxidation. If exposed to water, salt or fresh, without the presence of air, this film will not form and the metal will corrode. If the water in question is salt water, the process is accelerated.
I believe they are all going to rust away sooner or later wothout proper care.

Most hooks have a brown finish which has traditionally been called bronze, but it isn't really bronze. Bronze is a mix of copper and tin, which is soft and would make a terrible hook. Yet, it probably wouldn't rust. The best hooks are made from carbon steel. Stainless steel isn't as strong and does not hold a point like carbon steel. However carbon steel rusts easily. To discourage rust, all carbon steel hooks have a protective coating. With use, this coating can chip, crack or be damaged in other ways, allowing the water to reach the steel hook itself. Therefore make sure both your lure and your tackle box compartment are dry before putting your lure away.


T<---->--<>Lines
Kozlow http://www.tackle-rack.com/products.htm
http://www.partridge-of-redditch.co.uk/Hooks/GREY/GREY42.htm

Who say's they do? http://www.midwestbasstournaments.com/hooks_don't_rust.htm

No Rust Solution http://fire.worldpub.net/PRD/WPI/MAR/MAR_Main/1,3022,3-1-1-16650-281-334,00.html

That's my .03 cents
 

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Hook sizes and line strength have something in common, the manufactors all have their own standard. A 4/0 mustad with be a little different in size then an Owner 4/0.
I have heard that hooks rust out in 3 to 5 days but have wondered how accurate that really is.I'll have to bring some salt water home today and see how long in takes to disolve them.I also heard, that a stainless steel hook will rust out in freshwater faster then saltwater. But who knows for sure!
After you sharpen you hooks, use a sharpie marker on the point to keep them from rusting sooner.
You must be going to FSU "Free Shoe U" which is known for their excellent taste in producing a steady stream of beautiful nurses. :D
They also recruit a football team from the Leon County Jail. :mad:
How bout dem Gators :cool:
 

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Yeah lets hope they play better tonight than they have in the last 3 games. I will be very discouraged if they lose to Sam Houston a 15 seed.
 

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I almost always use the circle hooks now. I love the little ones for catching black drum, spadefish and sheepshead. How far up the coast are the cobia now? I want to catch one so bad.
 

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:confused: My bad Joe but I do believe the last sentence in bent hooks message was "How bout dem Gators " So in turn that was my reply. :confused: You shouldn't be too offended though cause they lost to Michigan State last night :mad:
 

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I do a lot of flounder fishing up in VA, and started using the circle hooks exclusively on my tagging outings.

Usually a strip of cut fish, or squid on the circle hook for bait, just bouncing through the sand and you just start reeling and get a lip hooked flounder.

You really, really do have to learn how not to yank the rod though, after years of heavy hook setting.

I can't say that I've ever used live-bait, or cut bait and gut hooked a flounder on a circle hook.

However, a couple times last fall when throwing live mullet on circle hooks, on untended sand-spiked rods, I did gut hook a few grey trout, but more lip hooked than gut-hooked.

THROW MORE BACK

Jake Ace
 
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