Pier and Surf Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,751 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Can anybody give me any feed back about the rods and reels either pro or con
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,457 Posts
I have heard both. I know people who really like the reels and say the rods are OK (Jangwuah) and people who say they are junk. So you will probably hear both here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,745 Posts
I just got my Okuma Solaris IM6 Spinning rod yesterday. The quality of the rod is average or I would say below average. What really disappointed me was the cork grip, it was el cheapo material with shady assembly, I could actually see how they wrapped the cork grip.

Don't know about how it will handle big fish but I guess I'll find out soon or later since I can't return it.

I also have two okuma reels, AV65 and EB65. Reels on the other hand are pretty nice. Lot of bang for the bucks. Smooth... :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,686 Posts
I would buy a better rod myself. The reels on the other hand are very good! They are forcing all the other reel companys to a higher standard and to make better reels....Tightlines
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,745 Posts
Does anyone know what IM6, IM8 stand for graphite rods? Is it some kind of rating for graphite?

Okuma Solaris rod had a IM6 label and a Bass Pro Graphite Rod had IM8 on it.

Just wondering if it stands for anything...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,457 Posts
Modulus ratings refer to the graphite fibers used in the construction of the blank. The higher the rating, the less fibers it takes to to make a blank of the same proportion. Generally, higher equates to lighter.
However, manufacturers use different resins and tapers to achieve like results. Also, guide weight, thread, and amount of finish have a great effect on the finished weight of the rod.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,686 Posts
Damn Huskys right...Here your answer it's a long read...Tightlines

ELIMINATING THE MYTHS
SURROUNDING GRAPHITE RODS
By Craig Baugher


Ever since the introduction of the first graphite rod by Fenwick in 1974, myths about this mysterious material have been growing and circulating the globe like wild fire. How many times have you been told that the difference between IM6, IM7, and IM8 is the difference in quality standard; or that the higher the modulus the more graphite was used to produce the rod?

With there being so many misconceptions surrounding this material, two of the world's foremost authorities on carbon fiber rods, Gary Loomis -- founder of the G.Loomis Corporation, and Brett Crawford -- President of All Star Graphite Rods, agreed to lend their expertise to eliminate these myths.

Gary began by explaining that the identifiers IM6, IM7, IM8 are the trade numbers used by the Hexcel Corporation to identify their Hercules fiber and is not an industry quality or material standard. Brett adds that these identifiers are more of sales and marketing tool. Consumers know these identifiers and can relate to them. All Star makes a rod that we call IM6 that is actually made from material that is 40-million modulus. The old IM6, which hasn't been available for nearly 10-years, had a modulus of only 36-million.

When it comes to modulus, both experts again agree that the reporting of modulus has been more of a marketing tool and should not ever be used as a measure of quality. For a number of factors go into designing a quality rod, and modulus is only one factor.

What an angler should understand about modulus is that it basically equates to stiffness. The higher the modulus the stiffer the material is by weight. Meaning less material is needed to achieve the same stiffness of lower modulus materials, and therefore less material is used, resulting in a lighter product.

Gary explained stiffness also equates to responsiveness, that is the rod's ability to store and release energy. The faster and more consistent a rod is able to store and release its energy, the farther and more accurately an angler will be able to cast.

But you cannot talk about modulus without including Strain Rate, or the measured strength of the material. While modulus is reported in millions, strain rate is reported in thousands. The higher the strain rate the stronger the rod. An acceptable strain rate for a fishing rod is 680,000 or higher. As an example, Gary indicated G.Loomis's GL3 has a modulus of 39 million and a strain rate of 750,000.

With the original materials used for graphite rods, as the modulus rate increased, the strain rate would decrease, resulting in the rods being brittle. As Brett explained it, "We (the industry) didn't know what we where doing with this stuff. However, through the advancements of materials, technology and engineering design, I believe most of us have worked through our early problems."Today, rod companies are able to produce high modulus, high strain rate rods. These new high tech fishing rods are super light, incredibly responsive, and extremely sensitive and strong.

But the misconception of brittleness still plagues them, and the reason for this is, because as the modulus gets higher the less material is needed and therefore is used. This means that the wall thickness in the blank, which is basically a hollow tube, is thinner. "You have to remember, weight is the deterrence to performance," Gary exclaimed, and went on to tell a story.

"I had a gentleman come in with a fly rod that broke near the handle, and was asking for a new rod. I examined his broken rod and knew from the break -- it was splintered -- that his rod broke from abuse. So I asked him how it broke, and the man, being sincere, told me it broke while fighting a fish. I explained that it would be nearly impossible for the rod to break this way. But to be fair, if he could break another rod the same way, I would give him 3 brand new rods of his choice. But if he couldn't, that he would pay for the repairs, and the man agreed.

So I took him out in the back by the shipping docks and handed him an identical rod. With the rod in his hands, I grabbed the blank, and asked him to apply the same pressure he was using when it broke. The man applied a great deal of stress on the rod, and it wasn't breaking. So I asked if he wanted to apply even more pressure, and the man responded that he didn't think he could, but insisted that is how his rod broke.

So then I told him, we are going to break this rod, so that it breaks just like yours did. I then laid the blank on a rubber mat and I kneeled on it by the handle and we tried it again, but it didn't break. Then I laid it on the concrete and kneeled on it. Examining the rod you couldn't see it was damaged, but this time the rod broke just like his did, and the man simply asked where he needed to pay to get his rod repaired."

The point of this story is that these high modulus, high strain rate rods are extremely strong, and are highly unlikely to ever break under normal use. Most all rods are damaged by other means -- an angler accidentally stepping on them, or hitting them against a hard surface while casting, or storing them where a toolbox or some other heavy object can slide into them -- and then with the damage done, the rod collapses while under the stress of fighting a fish. So while today's high modulus, high strain rate rods are not brittle, they do require more care in storage and transport.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,256 Posts
A fishing partner of mine bought the AV30 @ Dicks new store @ Lynnhaven for $40 last night and brought it to work to show it off. Nice looking reel and smooth action plus a great price, but almost too purrty to cover with fish guts.We'll see how it holds up to the fish if I can ever reteach him how to catch one. :D :D
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
5,774 Posts
The reels like nice and fish smoothly, but talk to anyone who repairs reels--they'll tell you that Okumas break if you look at them funny.

Admittedly, I don't fish them and so have little experience. But I trust the guys I know who work in tackle shops who repair reels, and they all are down on Okumas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
I like my AV series 50 and 80 spinning and my Integra 8/9 fly reel. The 89 Celeio (sp) fly rod I would have to say is average to above. Good prices and I think great quality.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top