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Discussion Starter #1
Just curious as to what is the going rate for Bloodworms.

Near as I can tell is 7.50/dz. Seems a bit high.

Tight lines
 

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yeah depending on where you go should be around 6.50 to 6.75 a dozen but word around is that might be going up to 7.50 a dozen here soon:eek:
 

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The average price is about $6-7 a dozen in most places. The cheapest I've heard is a little over $5.50. Depends on what you're fishing for but you're right, they are pricey and there might be other alternatives.
 

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Yeah looks like some of the price gouging has already started taken effect:(
 

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so....where do you get bloodworms? Earthworms live in the soil but what about bloodworms? They come in that wierd seaweed stuff....so are they in marshes/ocean? Is there anyway to catch them yourself?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Cut and Pasted from seaworms.com

The bloodworm (Glycera dibranchiata) belongs to a phylum of animals know as the Annelids. This group of organisms usually has an elongated, cylindrical shaped body consisting of a series of similar segments. Bloodworm are marine in nature and inhabit the intertidal and subtidal regions of mud flats. They can survive in areas with low oxygen levels and have the ability to tolerate fluctuating salinity rates. Bloodworms are found along the Atlantic seaboard from the Gulf of St. Lawrence to Florida, as well as through the Gulf of Mexico to Texas. They also exist on the West coast from California to Mexico.

These worms are creamy pink and have minute fleshy projections called parapodia which function during movement and respiration. Their common name "bloodworm" most likely originated from the fact that their red body fluid is visible though their pale translucent skin. Another distinguishing feature of these creatures is their large eversible proboscis which is armed with four poisonous jaws. Many a careless worm digger or fisherman has felt their painful bite.

A bloodworm's body can grow to be fifteen inches in length and be three-eighth inches in diameter. Their growth is dependent upon diet, temperature and salinity. Bloodworms are most abundant in the middle portion of the tidal flats. They feed on marine worms, mollusks and other invertebrates while burrowing through mud or sand.

In comparison to some other polychaetes, bloodworms are poor swimmers. However, they are excellent burrowers using their conical prostomium or lip, stiff parapodia, and peristaltic motion. Bloodworms sense through the use of tactile cells which are primarily located in their head area. An anterior brain receives impulses from a large ventral nerve cord, that runs from the anterior to the posterior end of the worm.

Bloodworms have separate sexes. Spawning is initiated during the middle of June, just prior to high tide. Water temperature is critical for spawning to occur. Suitable temperatures range from 55 degrees to 57 degrees Fahrenheit. Male worms spawn first followed by the females. Mature females may produce up to ten million eggs. After fertilization, the eggs rapidly change into larvae. Evidence suggest that the mortality rate is high on larval populations during this stage of their development. In two years, bloodworms reach a size where they can be harvested by worm diggers. The majority of the larger bloodworms taken in this fishery are probably in their third year of life. Very few often live to be four or five years old.

The bloodworm industry in Maine is a multimillion dollar a year business. Bloodworms are collected by worm diggers in the shallow mud of the tidal flats. The bloodworms are then brought to dealers by the diggers. Payment to the diggers is a daily or weekly basis depending on the dealer. At the dealers, the bloodworms are sorted and packed so that they can be shipped to markets located both here and abroad. Ultimately, the bloodworms are sold as bait to anxious sports fishermen who prize their effectiveness.
 

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thanks for the definition of bloodies Zak, but to answer your question the bulk of the bloodies come from Boston and other parts of New England. They dont dig for these , on a falling tide several workers wade out in the marsh and turn over what ever they can find normally its productive on every falling (low) tide. The price sky rocketed due to a strike they were having about 2 years ago. Actually the price dropped down from the original strike price. Its about right to be 6-7 bucks /dozen. Its just a cost of living increase.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Is that a reserve squadron? KI is even better. I'm going to be over at the Narrows this Saturday.

I'm over near Nat'l Naval Med. Center (Bethesda)
 

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not for me its a station that I monitor for others that know me. Its monitor the channel or give out the land line. The majority of boats from KI switch channels every year or two depending on how busy they are. What are you doing at the narrows on saturday?
 

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Ouch

I just called Anglers - and blood worms are $7.95 / Doz. Ouch! :mad: Are there any other bait shops open after 7pm on Fridays on the way from DC to SPSP? I didn't want to go to Anglers in the first place, but for $8/doz I am definately not going.
 

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Yeah, don't go to Anglers, the bloodworms are dead and small. Some are only 2-3" long last time I purchased them. I was shocked!! Did you give that Wal-Mart a try or are they out of stock?
 

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Wally World

I haven't tried wally-mart yet. I did call the Royal Farm Store in Annapolis and they said they had bloods for $7/doz. I forgot to ask their hours but they are usually 24.
 

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I have found it at $3.99/dozen at the last tackle shop on 235 near point lookout and on Rick's Shop in point lookout at $4.99. But don't bother buying them right now, everyone is catching skates and that's it, and small spot in which I used them as bait.
Last Friday I went to OC and fished the 50 brigde, catching blues on anything that you would through them, plastics, gotcha's, spoons everything. I saw a guy catching the biggest sea trout I ever seen around a 30" caught on small mullet. That my favorite spot so far this year.
 

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Some of you may already know this but most bait shops have two grades of bloodworms, those that they sell to the general public and those that are reserved for their regular customers. If you want quality bloods it's important to get to know the guys working there. If you're shopping for the best price you'll get what you pay for. I've been buying from the same guy for the last 4 yrs. and I only get quality worms. I'll call the day before I need them and my hand picked order is waiting when I get there. If anyone is fishing the Tank this Saturday morning I'll show you what I mean.

Catman.
 
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