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Hello everybody! Well I'm a complete stranger when it comes to flyfishing, but it sure has come across my mind, and I would like to broaden my horizons and pick it up. I'm looking for suggestions and little minor details one wouldn't know about flyfishing. I plan on fishing from a kayak in the rich waters of the chesapeake bay, also lynnhaven and rudee inlet as well, for stripers, pups, and specs, fish, etc.

1. Any recommendations for better rods and reels (compared to mid-grade shimano gear) i can purchase, not looking to spend no more than 150, but I think I really mean 100? Hah!

2. Anything i need to know about the line, i know its different but i'm sure its only line, and leaders maybe a different story?

I'm sure I'll have more questions once I get responses. Thanks!
 

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tough price range, but st croix has begginer outifts for about that price, although i think they only go to 8wt

my suggestion would be
rod :tfo 9wt @ 100
reel: pflueger president/teton tiogo/battenkill @ 130
line: intermediate @ 60
figure the outfit would be @ 300

and if you dont tie add another 50-100 for flies and stuff

try your local fly shop for some used equipment to keep the price down
 

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Youll be hardpressed to get a decent saltwater flyfishing set up for that price. TFO makes the best economic rods on the market IMO. The line is goign to vary on where you are fishing. If you are focusing on the inlets, Id go with a sinking tip line. You never tie to the line when you fly fish, you tie to your tippet. Depending on the targeted species, youll adjust your leaders accordingly. Basic break down is going to be 3-4 feet of Y pound mono, followed by 3 feet of X mono, followed by a couple feet of Z mono. obviously you are going down in test with each new section. Knot tieing is essential in fly fishing, because a large diameter knot will severely affect your ability to "throw" the line out of the guides on your rod.

I would suggest an 8 weight set up though, as they are normally the best for diversity. They will let you play with any big boy you may hook, and wont overpower smaller fish TOO much.

If you can, find some friends that fly fish. It is a VERY difficult sport/hobby to get into without having someone knowledgable with you. There are a lot more variables that go into fly fishing as opposed to regular rods and reels.
 

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The weight listing on a fly setup is a lot like the series number on a spinning reel (i.e 2000,3000,4000). An 8 weight would be ideal for most people who are targeting reds, flounder and stripers. Anything bigger and you will lose the fun on smaller fish, anything with less weight and you will be struggling to pull in upper slot reds or stripers.

Most people find the difficulty casting increases with the increased weight. Also, factor in that most fly combos do not come with line. Fly line is not mono. A good spool is going to cost you 60-100. If you skimp on the line up front, you will pay for it when it comes time to start casting.
 

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yup...

I have several outfits from 3wt on up. For each I have extra spools with floating, sinking tip and full sinking lines. On the Bay, I mostly use my 5wt. It's much easier to cast and is great for Specks, croaker etc. Being retired, I can pick my days, and do a lot of night fishing.

But try some fat croaker on a 3wt... they will give you all the fight you can ask for.

FW
 

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Definately Fly. Of course once you get into Fly fishing, you get the various weights for specific species. My 4 wt for bass, my 6 for carp and lower reds, my 8 for upper slot reds, my brother in laws 10 and 12 for Tarpon. But Iv found beginners do best with a 6-8 and of course, it makes more sense to start with just one setup
 
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