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Discussion Starter #1
HELLO I am new to this forum and I was wonduring if I could get some tips from you guys. Yesterday I went to BASS pro shop and bought my first salt water pole. It is a Penn Level wind 309 and a UGLY STICK that is 6'6 MH 20-50 lbs. I spooled the reel with 30lbs mono. Is anybody else using a set up like this? Any opinions on it? I bought this pole because I am going fishing in the florida keys for a few weeks this summer and I will also use it to fish off the coast of North Carolina. This summer I will be trying to catch baracuda, shark and anything else that will give a good fight. A freind of mine recomended that I use 50lbs Power Pro on my reel so I could catch bigger fish, do I need line that big? Does anybody have any tips or recomendations for my big fishing trip? (Most fishing will be done from piers bridges and beaches) Also some tips on casting this beast would help, I can get it across my street but not much farther. Back lash isnt a huge problem but I do get a little. Thanks for you replies this sure seems like a cool site
 

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Surf Fishing Tackle
The tackle used by surf fishermen encompasses a variety of specialized rods and reels, in addition to a multitude of different lures, bait and terminal tackle. Tackle selection is usually determined by the species targeted, required casting distance and water conditions. The key is to purchase tackle and gear that is appropriate for the conditions and species most often fished for. Many anglers who surf fish regularly will have several tackle assemblies so they can adjust to changes in fishing conditions through the year or on a given day.

Rods

Rod selection is primarily dependent on the distance to be cast and the weight of the lure or bait to be cast. Regardless of the length, it is recommended that the rod be a zoned action rod. A zoned action rod has a stiff butt end, a mid-section of medium flexibility and a soft, very flexible tip.

Short rods run 6 to 8 feet in length and are designed for use with lighter weight line and smaller lures or baits. In general, they are not capable of casting great distances and they do not perform particularly well in rough seas. Such rods are most useful when fishing for small, bottom dwelling fish that dwell just past the surf line. Shorter rods are a good choice for beginning surf fishermen because they are easier to control and offer the chance to learn how to cast properly.

Medium length rods run from 8 to 10 feet and predictably are able to handle moderate weight line and baits. These rods are a good compromise for many surf fishermen because they can be cast close to shore, yet are capable of casting fairly long distances to reach outer waters. The impetus for selecting a medium length rod over a short rod is generally to get greater distance on the cast and more leverage when playing a hooked fish. Trout, bluefish and smaller drum or commonly caught using medium length rods.

Long rods, also referred to as heavy gear, are most closely associated with the sport of surf fishing. These rods can run from 10 to 14 feet. The primary purpose of longer gear is to cast heavyweight bait long distances and catch large fish. It is not uncommon to use heavy gear to cast a 6- to 12-ounce sinker with a heavy chunk of bait 150 yards into or beyond the surf. Longer rods with heavier line also are more suited to rough waters.

Reels

Both spinning and conventional reels are effective for use in surf fishing, and it is really a matter of personal choice and comfort. Many surf fishermen choose spinning reels because they do provide the best casting distance capabilities. Other anglers are willing to endure a greater chance of backlash for the greater casting accuracy offered by conventional reels. Some expert surf fishermen also recommend conventional reels if the target fish are larger and stronger species. The chosen reel should be capable of holding a large amount of line, up to 200 or 300 yards depending on line weight.

Line

Like most of the surf fishing tackle, line is a matter of choice. However, it is usually directly related to the rod length and target species. Lightweight gear is not well suited to heavy line and light line on heavy gear is not going to be productive. Most surf anglers using short and medium length rods will use line with test weights between 10 and 20 pounds, perhaps going as high as 30 pounds. Even those who use heavy gear seldom go with more than 30- or 50-pound line. The exception comes on the leader, where line often will run from 60 to 80 pounds or more.

http://www.vtraveler.com/vt/marine/fish/

Sounds to me what you have will do ya just fine.

Your question about casting ?

My answer would be to find a field and practice till you get a feel for your gear. It will make a big diff. I did nothing but Fresh water fishing before I moved to the Sunshine State and when for the first time I had a 10 to 15 foot pole in my hand it was just a little bizzare to say the least. So practice . Distance will come with it , no fish with out it.

Thats my .02

Hope it Helps


 

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Discussion Starter #3
My favorite thing to do is catch a 2 1/2 foot houndie aka needle nose fish and put a hook threw it, than and put it on my big pole and drop it down and let it run out . That is how we caught some huge baracuda last year and I think my pole will be great for that. We also save the bonita we catch and use it for shark bait at night. My pole should work great for both of these. The clicker is very important when doing this so when you get a huge bite the fish/shark doesnt pull your rod off the pier. If I snap my 30lbs line 2 times doing this than I will have to put somthing bigger on my spool. What do you guys think?
 
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