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Hi everyone,

I will try and keep this short. I am moving to east coast canada (NS) and I want to fish striped bass. I been doing research on gear and decided on getting the following:
1. Penn Carnage II surface rod 10' Medium power
2. Penn Slammer III spinning reel 4500

I will likely run 20-25lb braid with a 3' fluorocarbon leader to a swivel and lure.

Questions
1. I want to primarily stuck with lures like topwater / jigs / plugs ect. and from my freshwater fishing, I know the lures weight should fall within the rods specs. The Carnage II 10' is rating for lures 3/4 - 3oz. I am not sure if the lures I will be tossing will be that heavy. I would imagine that any swimbaits I use won't meet these higher weights as well as some crankbaits. Will this be a problem? Or will I simply need to just search out heavy lures?

2. Is the 10' rod a good place to start?
3. Is my pairing of the rod and reel a good match for surf fishing for striped bass?

I am just looking for some advice and thoughts.

Thanks in advance!
 

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Hmmm, this thread might not belong to LDC subforum. My advice to you is to practise some casting only with sinker before using lures..... if you want distance so much. Merely distance is not so important in the begining. You don't need to cast 100 yards to get striper, IMO....

...also maybe 5000 or even 5500 size spinning reel would match better to 10 foot rod...

...and you can always attach some additional sinker weight to your rig if lure is too light...
 

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Anyway, aren't strippers more suitable for pier fishing rather then surf fishing? I've seen lot of videos on YouTube on how people fish for stripper and bluefish in New York harbour. It is kinda pier fishing, right? You don't need to cast far away....
 

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Anyway, aren't strippers more suitable for pier fishing rather then surf fishing? I've seen lot of videos on YouTube on how people fish for stripper and bluefish in New York harbour. It is kinda pier fishing, right? You don't need to cast far away....
I don't think you fish for strippers at all.

As for stripers, I don't think I've ever seen one caught off a pier (not that it can't happen), but yeah, they're caught in the surf. There may be a regional difference in how striper fishing is approached and I mostly fish the VA and NC beaches, but I saw a 60+ lb striper caught from the beach at Provincetown on Cape Cod.
 

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I don't think you fish for strippers at all.

As for stripers, I don't think I've ever seen one caught off a pier (not that it can't happen), but yeah, they're caught in the surf. There may be a regional difference in how striper fishing is approached and I mostly fish the VA and NC beaches, but I saw a 60+ lb striper caught from the beach at Provincetown on Cape Cod.
There are no strippers here at my place. I base my assumptions on European sea bass which belongs to same fish family as stripper. So you are correct. And yes VA and NC are both long sand beaches, probably surf fishing must have been extremely popular over there.

Anyway, I feel so ignorant on this forum because I am no native to sand and piers. We have lot of rocky coast and jetties here instead. I doubt you would find even single wooden pier here in Croatia. You can consider me as tourist or lurker on this forum, lol.....:p
 

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There are no strippers here at my place. I base my assumptions on European sea bass which belongs to same fish family as stripper. So you are correct. And yes VA and NC are both long sand beaches, probably surf fishing must have been extremely popular over there.
On the east coast of the US, striped bass are a migratory fish. They spawn and start out in our major bays and estuaries until they are bigger, then they head out to the sea. They are also anadromous fish so they can tolerate both saltwater and brackish water that is much sweeter. So in the mid-Atlantic region we can catch them anywhere in tidal rivers up to the fall line, in large bays and sounds, and out to sea on the continental shelf. When they are migrating they can come close to the shoreline and can be caught from the beach. I've caught them in the Potomac River at Washington DC, up and down the Chesapeake Bay, and in the surf of the coasts of Delaware, Virginia, and North Carolina.

They can be caught with bait or with lures, and caught by jigging, casting, trolling, and bottom bumping. They can drive bait up to the surface and you can sight cast or even fly fish for them, and because they also relate to structure you can fish pier and bridge pilings for them. They might be the royalty of mid-Atlantic fishes.
 
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