Pier and Surf Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
322 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've been fishing the northern beaches around Nags Head since 1975. I can't consider myself an expert because I don't live along the Carolina beaches and I am only able to fish 1 or 2 weeks
out of the year. I am a meteorologist and enjoy using my knowledge of weather and climate to fishing. For example, Spot and Blue runs on the outer banks piers are closely related to weather
conditions. About a year ago, I harvested 7 years worth of fishing reports from the Avalon Pier web site and made some graphs that show the best times to catch each species of fish. These
graphs can be found here:

http://bangladeshtornadoes.org/OuterBanks/Avalon/fishing/

Yes I know, even though my chart shows that Mullet should be running in early May at Avalon pier, this doesn't mean that you can go there any day in early May and catch Mullet. These graphs basically
allow you to increase your odds of catching a certain species of fish from piers along the Outer Banks such as Avalon, NHP Jennettes and Outer Banks. If the weather patterns in the days leading up
to your fishing day are not favorable for a certain species, then you won't catch those fish no matter what my charts show. It's similar to tornado chasing. If I pick a week to chase tornadoes In Kansas, I would pick May over July, November or January because tornadoes are not uncommon in May but are very rare in those other months. It's all about stacking the odds in your favor and there is no
certainty involved whatsoever. And as we know, fishing patterns can change from one year to the next and then change back the following year. Mullet are in greater abundance in certain years.
For example, in 2012, the Mullet bite started earlier and was great in the latter half of March. But from looking at sea surface temperature patterns, that Feb/Mar were extremely warm over the Carolinas.
So one could use the charts but then make adjustments based on current weather patterns and temperature anomalies.

Recently, Ive been shifting my attention to the southern beaches and trying to do something similar to the Avalon graphs. I have found reports for 4 piers (Jolly Roger, Seaview, Surf City and Bogue Inlet). These reports only go back 2 to 3 years and are not as detailed as the Avalon reports and are not daily. I have been looking at the pierandsurf reports starting back in 2003 to get additional reports
to fill the gaps but these are few and far between as well. Does anyone happen to know of a good source of old fishing reports that I could use in this project? Does anyone keep their own fishing reports or old pier reports?

Any help, advice or commentary would be greatly appreciated.

Hugehail
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
618 Posts
Wow there is someone that is farther from OBX than me. We used to live in Garden City 20 years ago. We were on a trip east and were forced to stop because of a huge Tstorm. We stopped at a McDonalds in Great Bend KS. To our suprize amusement disbelief and terror. On the walls of the McDonalds were pictures of the devistation of Great Bend after the 1911 tornado. As we sat there the sign on the car dealership blew off and went flying away.

Your closer to PINS than I am, keep up the good work and make those graphs for the average best time to fish. For the locals they just have a feel for it; but for those of us that have to travel more than 1,000 miles to get there it is a big help.

Just got $4,000 hail damage on one of our cars here in Iowa. Started out as golf balls and got bigger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
322 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Cool. Thanks for the response. Yeah I can see how that would be unnerving! BTW, once I was storm chasing in another state and called back to the car dealership in Dodge City to see when my car would be fixed and was informed that my car had major damage from big hail while sitting in the parking lot at the dealership. I did not make any insurance claim since I am a storm chaser even though my car wasn't in chase mode at that time--somehow it just didn't seem right. :)

Wow there is someone that is farther from OBX than me. We used to live in Garden City 20 years ago. We were on a trip east and were forced to stop because of a huge Tstorm. We stopped at a McDonalds in Great Bend KS. To our suprize amusement disbelief and terror. On the walls of the McDonalds were pictures of the devistation of Great Bend after the 1911 tornado. As we sat there the sign on the car dealership blew off and went flying away.

Your closer to PINS than I am, keep up the good work and make those graphs for the average best time to fish. For the locals they just have a feel for it; but for those of us that have to travel more than 1,000 miles to get there it is a big help.

Just got $4,000 hail damage on one of our cars here in Iowa. Started out as golf balls and got bigger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
Very cool for us data geeks, hugehail! I think your next step should be to determine what weather conditions lead up to the best bite for each species. No doubt wind direction (and speed) woud be important variables for at least a few species. The trick, like you indicated, is that it is not only the conditions on the day catches were made, but the conditions leading up to that day, that are important.

While fish behavior is definitely all science, fishing will probably remain a combination of science and art!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
322 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Yes, I agree. Thanks for the positive response. I already did this for Spot for the Nags Head area. See the scenarios I studied and I think you will like it. See section 4 of the following page on "the meteorology behind Spot runs".
http://bangladeshtornadoes.org/OuterBanks/OuterBanksFishing3.html


Very cool for us data geeks, hugehail! I think your next step should be to determine what weather conditions lead up to the best bite for each species. No doubt wind direction (and speed) woud be important variables for at least a few species. The trick, like you indicated, is that it is not only the conditions on the day catches were made, but the conditions leading up to that day, that are important.

While fish behavior is definitely all science, fishing will probably remain a combination of science and art!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,249 Posts
Great Info Thanx for sharing!
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top