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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Up till now I've been using only spinning reels. As of some time I've been atracted by this other type of reels... however, it seems there are two types of those: there is a multiplier reel and another one is baitcaster reel. They both seem very simmilar to me. What I understood by now, baitcasters are smaller. Is there any other difference but the size?
 

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baitcasters are typically thought of as small low profile conventional reels with a push button to disengage the spool from the gearing and a levelwind. the kinds of reels used for distance casting are typically thought of as conventional in the U.S. and multipliers in the UK and other parts of Europe.
 

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There are also fly reels that are called "multipliers", in that they have gears that change the retrieve speed. Most commonly, they were used for Atlantic Salmon fishing and can look somewhat similar to a conventional. They're not a type of reel that you would use for casting in the same manner as with a baitcasting or conventional.

The primary difference today between conventional reels and baitcasting isn't necessarily the size, and older baitcasters, prior to low profile reels being introduced, were as large as some conventionals. The main difference between them is the use of a worm gear, and level wind mechanism on baitcasters, although early reels didn't have those features either.

How the reel spool is engaged/disengaged may be another feature that might also separate baitcasters from conventionals as Surfjunkie said, you'll not see conventionals with thumb button releases, but some baitcasters will have a button type release. I have several older ABU reels, 4500/4600 to 6500/6600 series, most that I would consider as baitcasting reels, some have a button release and some with the thumb release, but all have level wind. I also have large models, 9000 & 10,000 series that IMO are conventionals since they don't have level wind, but are essentially the same reel as the smaller sizes in design, just larger versions.

It's likely safe to say that any of the low profile reels that have a thumb release and level wind would be considered a baitcaster, as SurfJunkie mentioned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Anyone heard of CT multipliers? From my understanding CTs are hybrids between conventionals and baitcasters. They are of smaller and more compact design than conventional reels but still they are not so small as baitcasters?

Also I have problem with differentiating conventional reels from trollers? Multipliers are in deed very complex issue.....

There are at least 4 types of multipliers:

1. conventional
2. trollers
3. baitcasters
4. CTs

Am I correct? I've found some pdf file from british Sea Angler magazine where John Holden praizes CT reels and puts them in as good alternative to conventional reels...
 

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Anyone heard of CT multipliers? From my understanding CTs are hybrids between conventionals and baitcasters. They are of smaller and more compact design than conventional reels but still they are not so small as baitcasters?

Also I have problem with differentiating conventional reels from trollers? Multipliers are in deed very complex issue.....

There are at least 4 types of multipliers:

1. conventional
2. trollers
3. baitcasters
4. CTs

Am I correct? I've found some pdf file from british Sea Angler magazine where John Holden praizes CT reels and puts them in as good alternative to conventional reels...
There are likely reels now that could be classified as more than one of these that you've listed. Perhaps at one time, the distinctions were easier to separate. I've always felt that a CT reel, was just a type of conventional, even though some have been built based on the same designs as baitcasters. The ABU reels are a good example, as they have been modified with Newell frames and other aftermarket parts, to eliminate some strength/flex issues in the original frames, and also remove the level wind feature. They're still mostly a distance casting reel, such as is frequently used in surf fishing applications, although they can be used for other purposes if you wish. To me they're not a reel that i would spend all day tossing lures with, unless it was a big surf lure. Certainly they're not something I would want to toss bass lures with here in the lake.

I own several older, simple design Penn reels, such as the 185, 285, and 65 models, and have primarily used them as a light trolling or bottom bait fishing reel. They can be cast, although would not be my choice for attempting to cast any distance. IMO, how these are all separated, might depend on how a person uses them, as there may not be any specific means to say, this is only a conventional, or only any of the other categories. IMO, the ABU Ambassdeur reels are baitcasters. I also have two other Penn reels, a 209, and a 309 and they're also what I consider baitcasters. I've used some of these reels for light trolling too.

Is a Penn Senator reel a troller or a conventional? I think some might say, they're one or the other, or both, and that may very well depend on how folks use them.

Interesting enough, I found this as definition for "Conventional" reels, which contradicts my own, as this implies they're only of the type that might be used offshore in from a boat. IMO, the remark about level wind is off base too:

Conventional reels are made for catching big, strong fish in rough conditions where other reels won't stand up to the strain. Their level-wind line retrieve combined with high amount of line storage set them apart from other types for reels for deep saltwater applications.

This is a definition for a baitcaster, and I also may not fully agree with it, since the same can be true for a conventional reel.
A baitcaster reel sits on top of the rod so the spool is parallel to the rod. It works well with monofilament, fluorocarbon and braid line types. The line on a baitcaster reel comes off the spool directly in line with the rod while the line of a spinning reel is let off away from the rod.

I got those from a search and again, how each of us defines these reels may be more of a personal nature by how we choose to use them.
 

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Whoa, hold on. Newell makes Ambassadeur frames? Where can we find them?
I could be wrong with that statement. I just seem to recall that there was a company that made frames that were used with the Ambassadeur reel parts, and I was thinking it was Newell. I'm old and don't always recall things correctly.

I just did some searching and may have been thinking of Tiburon frames for Newell reels that I had seen. Sorry about that! :rolleyes:

Blak Dog Tackle in England has some cool parts for upgrading ABU & other reels, but they use the ABU frames.
 

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Newell started with Carl making solid crossbars in aluminum and graphite for Penn reels, along with aluminum modular stands and light weight aluminum spools. This morphed into making non-Penn standard width kits, like the Albacore Special, Yellowtail Special, Broadbill, Black Marlin etc. that were either narrow or wider than stock Penn reels, simply swapped the plates onto Newell frame and spool kit. I have a few. Tiburon does the same now.

I've not seen either do anything for Abu, but it would be nice not to have to order from overseas given the amount of Abu's here. Mebbe the CT preference is specific to OBX and surrounding areas- it's annoying we can't easily get the International variants of Abu's, and that space is getting gobbled by Akios and Omoto (good reels, too). Most of what I see in the NE is given to spinners like VS, Penn, Shimano- at least on SOL. You guys up there correct me if my perspective is just narrowed to that read.

When I looked recently AKS frames were sold out everywhere I could find, and the other brand, I forget the name, I think went OOB. Rocket has their own shuttle frames, which Bob uses. Black dog and Rocket have CT bars which simply replace LW in yer ABU cage.

As to original question: a 6500C3 is certainly a baitcaster. Is a 7000C3? I'd say. What about 9000LW? 10000LW? Just bigger versions....I'd probably not throw plugs with a 10000 all day, but I might with a 7000. But that's just me. The little Senator 1/0 (basically a slow Jigmaster 501) is very castable and smaller than a 7000, but Senators for sure were considered conventional. The little Squidder 146 isn't a lot different dimensionally than a 5000, but no LW, but is a Squidder a baitcaster? I have a couple Cortez Conversions Squidder Jr.s that are about exactly the size of a Calcutta 400, but no LW. The 400 also has the S version, non-LW, but isn't the Shimano S still a bait caster? I don't think there is really a clear answer- there will always be an exception. Shaq could hold the 10000LW like I hold a 5000, so you really can't pin it on line capacity. My 0.02.

Ford v Chevy
30-06 v 270
Celtics v Lakers

I say, call it what you like, and use what you like. Just don't leave the plastic on a rod grip or reel a spinner upside down.
 

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Just don't leave the plastic on a rod grip or reel a spinner upside down.
I bought my first GLoomis rod a couple years ago. I left the plastic on the grip to preserve the price tag. Not sure why, I never fish with anyone besides my kids so it's not for show-and-tell. Maybe I'll remove it today.

To me multiplier and revolver are both English terms for baitcaster/conventional. There's not a clear line between baitcaster and conventional. In my opinion baitcasters are built for repeated cast and retrieve (has brakes, smallish frame, usually has a levelwind) while conventionals are more for soaking bait (might still have brakes, but frame is too bulky to comfortably make repeated casts). Things like Squall 12s and Calcutta 400s/700s/Saltist 20s blur all those lines.
 
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