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Discussion Starter #1
I tried a new knot this weekend. While the fishing was slow, I did manage to get a serious snag and the line held with me pulling full drag and bowing up the rod. The knot felt strong in the hand, so I felt comfortable with it. It even bit on Suffix Elite line which I've had some issues with the no-name knot. So how did I tie it? Just like a silly snell, but on my spider hitch to attach the leader and attaching terminal tackle. Instead of wrapping around a hook like in the silly snell, I wrapped the line around itself on terminal tackle on the line on the other side of the eye. When tying on the leader, I wrapped it around the loop of the spider hitch.

Does this knot have a name? It's sort of an inverted no-name or uni. The loops start furthest from the terminal and work inwards instead of starting close to the terminal and working outwards. How does it hold up to other knots?
 

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On the shock leader, it's pretty much a no-name with the coiled properly. Although to tie a no-name, the coils go up away from the loop, when cinched down right, they should invert and coil onto itself so that the coils form moving towards the loop.

On the terminal tackle (like a hook or swivel), that would be a reverse clinch. Like the no-name, when cinched smoothly, the coils will invert onto itself.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
On the shock leader, it's pretty much a no-name with the coiled properly. Although to tie a no-name, the coils go up away from the loop, when cinched down right, they should invert and coil onto itself so that the coils form moving towards the loop.

On the terminal tackle (like a hook or swivel), that would be a reverse clinch. Like the no-name, when cinched smoothly, the coils will invert onto itself.
That's it. Thanks
 

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I don;t have the magazine issue handy at the moment but a recent issue of Field and Stream did tests. They found that the ideal number of wraps was five, it provided the most strength when tested to other options. Just thought I'd throw that one out.
 
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