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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well its been a few months since I've posted and it took a while to read all the new posts. I saw Mike, Mr. Jeep requested a king rig 101 and being that I owe him a favor here it is. Again, this is a 101, if ya need 200 or above don't ask me.

As far as background, you want to throw king rigs with good wind. Depending on location winds differ, but generally an onshore wind is what your looking for. Clean water and 70degrees are others.

To king rig you need a

1. Anchor rod. I've seen guys use 9ft spinning rods down at OCP, and of course in obx and hatteras alot of guys will use heavers with a min of 20lb running line and shock.

2. Fightin rod. Boat type rod 6-7 footer with a reel capable of holding at least 400yrds of line. There is so much in the way of variety there. I personally like the tld25. Holds 600 yrds of 30lb. I've seen kings caught down south(ocp) on basically bass rods with an international 975 with braid on it, and i've seen penn 6/0 and I've seen guys fish with stuff that I think could land a boat. You definately want capacity more than anything else, a king will usually make a heckuva first run and take a whole lot of line. I would recommend nothing less than 20lb test because of cobia.... If your fishin and its strictly kings, you could downsize if you wish... Also, your not on the beach anymore so you cannot follow the fish, your stationary and the fish is the one moving. One of those cases of better to have the extra line and not need it, than to need it and not have it.

3. Anchor sinkers. Don't try and use a sputnik and no pyramids will not work mr. griswald. Use an anchor.

4. King rigs and PINS.

5. Bait Bucket. There are numerous threads, mostly by NJeff (who btw will steal your bait bucket and cast net in a heartbeat) its nice to have to make sure you don't run out of bait, there are days I would have paid 20bucks for a candy bar(bluefish about the size of a candy bar). 5-7gallon bucket, and I'll let one of the other guys sticky or post the link to that thread here.

6. Bait rod with a plug for blues and spanish.

7. GAFF. DO NOT LET THE NEW GUY GAFF YOUR FISH. If you hear someone on the pier saying...."I've never gaffed a fish before, hopefully I can gaff one today" don't let that guy gaff your fish!!!!!

8. Beer/sunscreen or some other method of passing what will be a LONG wait.

9. Alot of folks will also have a bucktail rod for sightcasting. Please have some common sense, do not throw at a fish that is in baits.

So with that being said, lets get to rig makin.



Basically there are two trains of thought. Malin single strand wire or sevenstrand. I've used both, both have their pros and cons. If you use single strand your going to be using haywire twists, with sevenstrand your doing figure 8 knots. I personally prefer the single strand. I also only use a rig once, and I throw it away after a days use, more than likely after your first fish on it, the rig is chewed up pretty badly. This spring at OCP with all the chopper blues110+lbers you were going through 8-9 rigs a day. In anycase between big blues, sharks etc, you definately want to make sure you have extra rigs tied up.

Heres what you need.
1. barrel swivels
2. malin wire(i use 61lb)
3. Gami 3/0,4/0,5/0 live bait hooks(smaller for kings, larger if theres a good shot a a brown thing)
4. Eagle claw 4x strong #4 trebles



Run a 5-6ft piece of wire and clip it. Take one end and run a barrel swivel through it and begin a haywire twist.(run about 8 inches of wire through, make a loop(dont kink the wire)


make 4-6 wraps as if your joining the two wires together.


After that, make 3-5 barrel wraps


Essentially that is a haywire twist. Now from there you are going to be left with a tag end.(have more easier to break off DO NOT CLIP IT OFF).

The way that I have found that is the easiest to get rid of the tag end is to take the tag and make a loop. Put your finger in the loop and twist the tag end and after about 4 full rotations it should snap off cleanly with no edges to cut into you later





Next, connect your main wire to your main hook(with a haywire).(if your fishing mostly kings, a treble will do, mostly cobia you might want to use just two live bait hooks and no trebles... all preference.) In this particular case I'm making a general rig with a live bait hook and two trebles.

Take some more wire and haywire 2 trebles and leave about a foot each on the main wire.


At this point, you should have two treble hooks with about a foot of wire left on them and your main wire with your choice of hook attached to it.

To connect, take one of your trebles, and go through both the eye of your main hook as well as the loop you have as well.

Leave about four inches or so and then make another haywire and remove the tag.

Take your second treble and go through the eye of the now attached treble and loop.


Your finished rig should look like this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Next is your pin...

heres what you need.

1. 131lb or higher wire
2. Snap swivel
3. 2/3/4 oz sinker
4. beads
5. Colored float(optional)


Take a piece of wire and cut(approx 14-16 inches)

Make a bend right in the middle and put a snap swivel in there.


Next, slide up a bead


You can put on a float(optional) I like to just so I can pick my rig out in the water and know where my line is.


Slide up a sinker next, i like heavier ones, bc it helps the bait move down your anchor line and keeps it where I put it


Lastly, Take a few more beads and put them behind the sinker and clip whatever excess wire(leave about 3-4inches) and put a kink in them so they are perpendicular to the doubled section of wire. Your finished pin(or "release) should look like this

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Now to put it all into play.

Take your anchor rod and attach your sinker and bend the tines back.


Cast it out and set your anchor into the sand. Everyones got their preference as far as location where they want to be, proximity to pier etc. You'll eventually develope your own as well.

Next your king rig should be attached to your fighting rod.

take your bait(bluefish, if not avail whatever. a crappy bait is better than no bait)
and stick your main hook in near the dorsal.


Take your first treble and stick him by the tail somewhere


The second treble(stinger hook) you can do one of two things. Some guys stick the hook in the fish's anus for a king coming up from under the bait(hence the term "skying"). I like to leave mine dangling.



Take your pin, and attach it to your anchor line via the snap.


Attach your rig to your pin via the swivel and tines coming off of the pin like so.



lower your rig into the water. slow enough to be careful and not pop your pin, fast enough so your bait isnt dead before it hits the water



your Complete configuration should look something like this.



There it is Mike, your King Rig 101. I'm sure guys will chime in and give other info, improvements and ideas as well. I wish you guys some good luck this summer(but less than me of course!)
 

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Great Post!!!

I use a double drop type rig, with a #2-4X behind the head, and a #4 stinger below, and a #4 back towards the tail. If there are Tarpon in the area, I'll use a 5/O Owner semi circle single, with a #2 trailing treble. Alot of different variations for sure. It's all in what works for the individual.
I make the releases also, but use 278# wire, with shorter ends, going through the eye of the swivel.
I'm heading to Topsail Island, N.C. for some Pier Fishing, Sunday-Thursday. Hopefully get to hook up with a Tarpon, but, anything that makes the 30TW scream, is fine too!

PD
 

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Neil covered the basics.

There's nothing I can add, cause I barley know the basics.

But here's a couple of things I've learned from guys who know.

I use about 50' of 50lb leader attached to the main line on my fighting rod. This gives you a little more abrasion resistance if your fish gets into the pilings.

I use ball bearing snap-swivel on at the end of my fighting reel. I hear this helps your bait to swim easier. I'm not positive this helps, but it can't hurt.

I moved up to 240lb wire for my pins. You could even go higher. After having my baits pop several pins using 131lb ... then having my anchor line break ... the thicker wire has saved me from losing even more pins. (Thanks, Rolland.)

Here's a link to my DIY Bait Bucket thread. This King Rig 101 thread makes explaining how to build a bait bucket look like child's play.

http://www.pierandsurf.com/forum/showthread.php?t=53216&highlight=diy+bait+bucket

Nice work, Neil.
 

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Yeah, the heaver he has standing up in the pvc is just an anchor rod. The boat rod is for fighting. When the fish hits, it will just pop the fighting line off of the prongs. Then game on.
 

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How long is the leader from the "pin" to the bait?

Do you leave it long enough for the bait to swim freely, and will it tangle with the anchor line if you do?
The most common length here on Nags Head Pier is about 6 feet ( + or - ). Most folks run about 3 foot of wire and 3 ' of 80 lb. mono. The bait is run down the anchor line until it's floundering near the surface and creating the most disturbance. A little deeper is okay as well. Even deeper if ospreys are bombing the baits. ;-)
 

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"How long is the leader from the "pin" to the bait? "

Depends on how many rigs are are out on the end and how close they are togeather. Diffrent piers set there marks on the rails at different distances apart, some 4',6' I have even seem 8'. Keeping the bait from getting into your ancor line isnt bad, just keep your fighting line tight and set the bait were you need it. This is were having the right weight on your pin release comes into play. The wind will blow your pin around if it is to light and put slack in your fighting line, and make it hard to run your bait out very far if needed.

Your leader length may be 4' to 6' your main thing to keep in mind is if the rigs are close togeather you dont want to get tangled with the bait or ancor line on each side of you. I run a 5' leader most of the time, but there are times when I need a shorter leader and some times one a little longer. I also try and keep my bait off set from the baits on each side of me. In other words I try to set my bait infront or behind the other baits or right in the middle between them. So they are not swimming all right togeather.

I keep allot of diffrent rigs made up, with different length leaders and different size hooks. If the water is real clear I will run lighter wire and smaller hooks. If there is a chance of Cobia or Tarpon I will run larger hooks and bigger wire. Depends on the time of year and whats been in the water.

I also keep different rigs made up for different size baits. I have rigs made up so if all I can get is small bait im good to go, or if all I can get is big blues Im good to go. You can change the distance between your hooks just by making the wire shorter or longer when you make up your rigs. To me it helps the bait swim more natural and helps keep the hooks and wire hid better in clear water. And the bait will live longer if it is able to swim right.

How deep I run the bait depends on how warm the water is and what type of bait I have. If the water is hot, I run the bait a little deeper than I normally do. (A little longer leader helps in this case)

Also keep several different release clips made up with different size weight. If the wind picks up or you deside to run out further then when you change your bait just change the release size. Same with wire size just match it to the bait size and have a couple different sizes made up and ready to go!

I also use a new rig after a fish or if it showes any sign of needing changed. You spend to much time waiting for your number to be called to have something fail in your tackle at the wrong time.


Brent
 

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Those haywires

Those haywires aren't very good really. You got one wire that twists while the other stays straight. They should be twisted together. That is, they should be both twisted the same way. That's what does the actually holding, not the barrel twist.

I'll post a pic here in a bit.
 

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This might be a little off topic but for your fighting rod can you use a heavy high cap spinning reel? I do realize that when a king takes off with your bait a conventional just lets out line and fights that kinda fish a little better, but have you ever seen a spinning reel used?
 

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King Rigs

You guys have done a bang up job of sharing your rigs.

Here's mine: I will fish from a pier, but prefer the sand because of the rowdiness that goes on by some inconsiderate slobs.

When fishing the sand(surf), I use a 15 foot spinning rod; normally used for tomato stakes and bean poles.:) as the anchor or mud rod. This gives me adequate height to clear the breakers.

I use a similar release mechanism that is explained before,(the one with two wires) but with a pigtail which provides a 'one way' action for the slide. Necessary because of the breaker action. It keeps the bait out instead of being pushed in by the breakers. Breakaway makes a commercial version called a 'Slideaway'. I make my own. I don't use a float as a marker, but you know that in the future that I will, as it is a good idea! Thanks

I use a sputnik with stronger arms and deeper slots to anchor the mud rod.

I use a 7 foot spiral wrapped rod that I made, blank is of unknown origin, but will lift a truck.

That's about it folks.

I cast out with the anchor rod, get it anchored well then put it in a spike.

I bait up the fighting rod and hook the pigtail to the line on the anchor rod with the release wires inserted into the eye of the swivel on the fighting line. When the fish hits, it pulls the two wires from the release devise on the mud(anchor) line and the fight is on! I usually use heavy line on the fighting rod in case of a 'biggie' coming along.

I first saw this method used by the shark fishermen down in Texas, including the release mechanism. They used them off the BHP Pier. Thanks Thumbburner and the rest of the guys <:fishing:

I brought it home and used it.

Now a lot of people use it and call it a trolley rig, which it isn't. That's another story.

I also use what is called an 'Ulea' Rig, learned from the guys in Hawaii, which uses one rod and a breakaway sinker. Again, another story; another time.

I don't call it a kingfish rig, but 'anything that will bite' rig. I have caught everything on this rig: kingfish, cobia and yes; sharks.

Sorry about the length of this post, but I get carried away talking about fishing. I do miss Gowge and our daily telephone conversation. RIP Gowge.

My thanks to the edification by the previous posters. I owe you all .C2
 

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The Dubro Haywire Twist tool is very good for getting those wraps even.

As for spinning reels, a guy I used to king fish with on Virginia Beach pier caught one in the neighborhood of 25# on one of those green, no-bail, Penn spinning reels using a float rig.
 

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Those haywires aren't very good really. You got one wire that twists while the other stays straight. They should be twisted together. That is, they should be both twisted the same way. That's what does the actually holding, not the barrel twist.

I'll post a pic here in a bit.
Please don't take offense to this, but the haywire twists he has tied in the photos are just as good as the ones tied with the Dubro haywire twist tool on the dubro web site, and Neil tied those by HAND! If you want to pick apart a thread you may want to have more than 11 posts to your credit before you do do.
 

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I've never seen a spinning reel used on a fighting rod but would think it would be okay as long as the drag was good and it had the line capacity needed. The most popular reel around here is a TLD-25 which will hold approximately 600 yards of 30 lb.

Now guys will use a spinning reel on their anchor rod, but line capacity isn't an issue in that situation.
 

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Uhh

Please don't take offense to this, but the haywire twists he has tied in the photos are just as good as the ones tied with the Dubro haywire twist tool on the dubro web site, and Neil tied those by HAND! If you want to pick apart a thread you may want to have more than 11 posts to your credit before you do do.
I am sorry, those are not good Haywires. You don't leave one wire straight and just wrap the other around it.
http://www.georgepoveromo.com/perfectlyhaywire.htm

Just trying to save someone the grief of losing the fish of a lifetime.

EDIT: I watched the DUBRO video. If you look closely you'll notice that the Dubro tool intertwines the two wire symmetrically.

You don't have one wire straight, with the other wrapped around it. Doing it that way causes the twists to slip under heavy load. This is leads to a failure.

A lot of people get away with crappy haywires by using heavier wire than would otherwise be necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I am sorry, those are not good Haywires. You don't leave one wire straight and just wrap the other around it.
http://www.georgepoveromo.com/perfectlyhaywire.htm

Just trying to save someone the grief of losing the fish of a lifetime.

EDIT: I watched the DUBRO video. If you look closely you'll notice that the Dubro tool intertwines the two wire symmetrically.

You don't have one wire straight, with the other wrapped around it. Doing it that way causes the twists to slip under heavy load. This is leads to a failure.

A lot of people get away with crappy haywires by using heavier wire than would otherwise be necessary.

yeah, they aren't that great. Like I was saying earlier, you want to do them together, but also like you said, most people get away with it. I appreciate you taking the time to put up a proper photo.

On a side note, we should mention fighting a fish. When a king hits your bait, you dont need much of if any of a hookset. The king has usually hit your bait like a train so he's usually all up in it. Let your fish run all he wants otherwise you risk pulling hooks or bringing a green fish around pylons(neither of which are good).
 

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my .02

i use a longer leader then most..around 8 feet.on hot or rough days you want your bait deep...not hot or beat by waves.

i only use about 8 inches of wire...maybe 12..above my livebait hook..80-130 lb mono above that...

keep hooks needle sharp...not so sharp hooks will just bend on hookset instead of penetrating...learned that one the hard way
Now we're talk'n.... ;)
Big spinner,Tarpon,cobe,any fish that jumps can kink wire... imho the mono you suggested always worked great with the wire.. Swivel can be elliminated by an albright attaching the 130 to the wire.. I used two 4/0 mustad singles in the fish that some may consider overkill with a treble as a stinger..

As far as keeping the bait deep>> shhhhhhh :D

Sharp hooks are key,as you said... Twist in the wire are also important,if you can't make them wrap each other correctly by hand,you need the tool.. Not just opinion,I've seen wire kink and fish lost because of it..

Some use all wire,three trebles,and a bait right on the top,to each his own,jmo..
 
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