Pier and Surf Forum banner

61 - 80 of 94 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I'm no saltwater expert, but I'm guessing my bass gear 7'3 + foot baitcasters with 30lb braid/flouro leader will work casting for babies in the surf?
Well I’m no freshwater expert but I suspect the rod and line will work just fine. As for the reel, I’ve never used a baitcaster in the surf but I suspect you can (maybe someone else on here can shed a better light on this). If you want to give it a try some of the cheaper Daiwa spinning reels are a good bang for the buck and pretty reliable without too much cost.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #63
Take the reel completely apart and clean it when you get home. Yes. Keep it out the sand and water.
Yea, I'm definitely not going to dunk my Revos in the surf unless it happens accidentally. I'll spray everything off daily while i'm there. I've got a Revo Inshore that I throw bama rigs and big swimbaits on that i'm definitely bringing. Also have a surf rod that we bought years back that still works good. We are gonna have a good time either way. My US Senator should come one day next week. I'm going to wait until i get there and get a decent rod for whatever type of fishing we end up doing for bigger fish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,168 Posts
Use LOW pressure when you spray them off to avoid washing salt into the reel. I also use a few drops of dawn dish soap in a spray bottle of water to spray reels off before I rinse them to help get the salt off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #65
Absolutely! I've got 30lb braid on most of my rigs with either 12-20lb floro leaders on them. Will that be sufficient for the surf?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Will be fine. Alabama rig rod would be great for light surf. Only concern is my bass baitcasters hate sand, compared to my old clunker surf reels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #67
Will be fine. Alabama rig rod would be great for light surf. Only concern is my bass baitcasters hate sand, compared to my old clunker surf reels.
True that. I’ve got a spinning surf outfit and a 113N Penn US Senator as well. Waiting to buy a rod down there when I figure out how I’ll be using it. No need to buy a heaver if we are gonna kayak bait out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,168 Posts
Not trying to sound negative but you shouldn't put a senator on a casting rod. You will not be successful in casting far. I can sling 8 n bait about 430 foot on a good day, and I couldn't cast that senator 100 foot on a heaver without a huge mess. It's like entering a f350 in a formula 1 race. Get a 7 or 8 foot stand up rod for it and a tall sand spike to keep you line up out of the surf, and yak baits out.

Also get a fighting belt, preferably one with a large back brace.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Benji is right on.

Even reeling in a yakked bait with no shark is laborious, and that is mostly done with the rod spiked. Reeling in a shark from hundreds of yards is hard work, definitely get a fighting belt.

There'll be no casting the Senator, for sure.

Biggest reel I would put on a heavier would be a like a Fathom 40 star drag, and that would just be for big sharks reasonably close in. A Fathom 15 will cast way more easily, and handle sharks to 6 ft or so.

Casting heavy weight from the beach is an almost entirely different skill set from using a baitcaster in freshwater. Consider the physics behind launching an 8 oz weight + bait, with a 12 ft rod..... If you can't get a good grip on the spool while the rod loads during the cast, game over. Then there's the matter of spool control once the bait is flying. A big spool is a lot tougher to control than a small one, hence the popularity of small conventional reels for surf fishing.

Safe bet for July trip is heaver/big spinning reel, and yakked baits for sharks. If you go conventional /heaver, find a secluded spot to fish, and buy plenty of extra terminal tackle..... Trust me, I know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #70
The reel I’m talking about is the US senator. It’s the direct replacement for the Baja special. It’s supposed to cast darn good
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,168 Posts
I know exactly what it is. I have a pair of red 4/0 senators that are much older than me, at 40, still in perfect working condition. The reel hasn't changed much since it was first introduced.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
The 113N will be a good casting Senator, but realistically expect 40-80 yards on a good cast starting out. Less in a decent headwind.

Honestly your physical size and strength is a big factor in casting a setup like that.

I started out with an aluminum spool Jigmaster on an Ocean Master heaver, similar to your setup. No casting brakes (magnetic or centrifugal) on those, so the learning curve is steep!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #75
I know exactly what it is. I have a pair of red 4/0 senators that are much older than me, at 40, still in perfect working condition. The reel hasn't changed much since it was first introduced.
We are the same age!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Yo casting a conventional reel with a lot of weight is a skill in it's self. I got a old diawa I throw with no brakes and it's all thumb but it doesn't give me problems unless I go full blast first cast. So I do a few warm of cast to wet the line and get the old girl ready to move. I got new conventual reels and they are much harder to throw with no breaks because spool speed I think. But I put the mags on and I can throw anything in any condition if there set high but you loose distance. I shark fish a lot and it can be a lot of work for nothing or even more work for something good. With yaked out baits on heavy gear it goes like this, under 5ft you barely feel 5-9 ft are the fun fish that fight but are easily caught, 9-15 is were it starts to become a struggle. Your gear is good for 9 and under. So with that in mind you don't need to focus on distance and massive baits, eespecially in a good area. If y'all could fish 4 caster and a yaker you'd have a decent spread to increase chances. I'd fish the linear even though they will be spread out. So that means one at like 40yds out 80, 100, 120 and then drop the yak bait at least 200. This covers the most water. Fish typically swim by the beach in a pretty similar line to the shoreline so if you throw all your rods 40yds out your really only covering the one zone even though you have 4 baits in it. I only put them in the same area once I've figured out where the bite is concentrated. A variety of bait is good. Small baits can catch big fish and with caster sometimes it's better to sacrifice bait size for distance. If you can only get a bait the size of a quarter out to the spot your better fishing that in the good spot the a big bait short of it. You can also play the tides, sometimes I'll setup knowing I'm waiting for a tide or bite window that might be a full tide away. I'll short cast a big bait at low and when the tide comes in your in a good spot at high tide. Your best odds of catching a big shark will be based off your bait. If you catch fresh bait on the beach and cut it up right before you use it, you will maximize your odds. I'd start with mullet on the casters and get a ray or shark and then use that for bait for the yak bait. If you get the big 1/8 gauge spider weights you want to rig it like a reef anchor, then when your weight breaks away it reals in backwards.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #77
Yo casting a conventional reel with a lot of weight is a skill in it's self. I got a old diawa I throw with no brakes and it's all thumb but it doesn't give me problems unless I go full blast first cast. So I do a few warm of cast to wet the line and get the old girl ready to move. I got new conventual reels and they are much harder to throw with no breaks because spool speed I think. But I put the mags on and I can throw anything in any condition if there set high but you loose distance. I shark fish a lot and it can be a lot of work for nothing or even more work for something good. With yaked out baits on heavy gear it goes like this, under 5ft you barely feel 5-9 ft are the fun fish that fight but are easily caught, 9-15 is were it starts to become a struggle. Your gear is good for 9 and under. So with that in mind you don't need to focus on distance and massive baits, eespecially in a good area. If y'all could fish 4 caster and a yaker you'd have a decent spread to increase chances. I'd fish the linear even though they will be spread out. So that means one at like 40yds out 80, 100, 120 and then drop the yak bait at least 200. This covers the most water. Fish typically swim by the beach in a pretty similar line to the shoreline so if you throw all your rods 40yds out your really only covering the one zone even though you have 4 baits in it. I only put them in the same area once I've figured out where the bite is concentrated. A variety of bait is good. Small baits can catch big fish and with caster sometimes it's better to sacrifice bait size for distance. If you can only get a bait the size of a quarter out to the spot your better fishing that in the good spot the a big bait short of it. You can also play the tides, sometimes I'll setup knowing I'm waiting for a tide or bite window that might be a full tide away. I'll short cast a big bait at low and when the tide comes in your in a good spot at high tide. Your best odds of catching a big shark will be based off your bait. If you catch fresh bait on the beach and cut it up right before you use it, you will maximize your odds. I'd start with mullet on the casters and get a ray or shark and then use that for bait for the yak bait. If you get the big 1/8 gauge spider weights you want to rig it like a reef anchor, then when your weight breaks away it reals in backwards.
I appreciate ya reds. From Salvo south we should be okay?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
322 Posts
If it's too rough to yak your baits out, you can just get those young bucks to swim em out. Old school! :LOL:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #79
Oh man. They are mountain tough, not ocean tough. There are different versions lol. They will drag a deer or hog or bear through laurels and over cliffs but I don’t know about swimming in the ocean lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,311 Posts
Oh man. They are mountain tough, not ocean tough. There are different versions lol. They will drag a deer or hog or bear through laurels and over cliffs but I don’t know about swimming in the ocean lol.
Time to mountain man up.

Pick up a dinged up surfboard when you get to the beach and have them Country Boys turn into Surf Men, if it is too gnarly to paddle out in a kayak.

Red Head and his Brother used to paddle their Shark baits out in the 70's.

My Great Uncle used to snorkel and spearfish the outer reefs off the North Shore of Oahu. He had a twenty foot rope that he would drag the speared fish behind him as he kept fishing. Most times he got back on the beach with his catch but sometimes the Galapagos Sharks or the Tigers took their share.

I did my fair share of surfing when I was young, but I will admit that I never dragged a Shark Bait out. It was bad enough at a place called Boneyards off Encinitas CA, just to be the only one left in the lineup waiting on a wave...…..
 
61 - 80 of 94 Posts
Top