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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I decided today that my pier cart needed replacing, and having the afternoon free I went about constructing a simple and cheap new one. My budget on this thing was $30, and I still have some left over.

My design includes space for six rods, a cooler, a tackle box and a 5 gal bucket. You can adjust the number of holders to suit your needs.

Supplies
1.5" PVC - Can be bought at Lowes in 5' sections for $3.47. I bought 10'.

11" Zip Ties - Pack of 100 runs $9.98 at Lowes

Hand Truck - This is the expensive part. You want one with crossbars that bow towards the handle (see pics). The most basic version is $20. A good one with pneumatic tires will run $45 at least. I was able to find a used one in good condition at Goodwill, which happens to be right next to the Lowes. Cost: $5.50

2 x 1.5" PVC pipe caps - $0.25 each

Extra: Accessory Clip - Found this in the hardware isle for $1.97, figured I could use it.

Hand Saw

Bolt cutters or Wire cutters

Super Glue

Now we're set.

The Build

I started out by cutting the PVC. You want to end up with six 18" pieces. Sand the edges to remove the "fuzz" from the cuts and to smooth out the pipe edges. Rounding the edge helps prevent scratches on your rods. I did mine with a curved woodworking knife and some fine-grit sandpaper.



The first thing that goes on the cart is the accessory hook. Use two zip ties to attach the hook to the top crossbar.



Now you need to figure out where on the hand truck you want to rod holders. The reason for the bowed crossbars is that there will be enough clearance for two holders on the inside of the frame. Place them side by side, near the center and high if you have long rod butts (surf rods) or lower if you have shorter butts. Zip tie these holders in place using a cross pattern, one set of ties near the top of the pipes and the other near the bottom.



Place your rods in these holders before you tighten the ties to make sure the butts don't drag on the ground. Raise or lower as necessary and tighten the ties.

Take the two caps and super glue them on one end of two pipes. These pipes are going low on the side bars. Zip tie one pipe on each sidebar, making sure that they don't rub on the wheel. I used six ties on each of these pipes, evenly spaced to keep them from rotating or slipping down. Squeeze a small line of superglue onto the pipe where it touches the sidebar for a bit of extra hold.



Next you need to break out the rods again. If there is enough space to run a rod through the handle, you can attach the last two pipes on the back side of the crossbars. If not, the other two holders could be placed high on the sidebars. I chose to place one holder high for a surf rod and one low for a king rig.



You can also see the spacing on the bottom side holders here.



Another picture of the cross ties.

Now let's take a look at the wheels. The stock wheels on my cart have plastic rims and bushings. I like the bushings because sand and salt tend to permeate wheel bearings. The plastic rims, on the other hand, could turn out the be a problem if the plastic is thin. A trek down the pier causes all kinds of banging, shock and stress on the wheels and my old cart developed cracks in the rims.

To remove the wheels, start by removing the retainer pin. It might require straightening, which is a simple lob with pliers. DO NOT LOSE THE PIN!



You can now remove the wheel, just make sure you remember the order that pieces came off the axle.



You can now switch the wheels out for metal ones or pneumatics. Replacement wheels can be found at any hardware store. The plastic on these looks pretty thick, so I just greased the axle and the bearings before reattaching the wheels.

All that's left is to clip the tag ends of the zip ties and you are ready to fish!

The completed cart, empty in the driveway:



And all loaded up:









Here's a closeup of the accessory hook, with bucket attached:



Final Cost: $26.14 after taxes

All you need is two bungee cords to hold the tackle box and cooler.

The best thing about this cart is that you can change the setup to fit the fishing you are doing. Add pneumatics and move the holders higher on the cart for a surf cart. The way I have it now is good to carry two complete pin-rig king setups (two fighting rods, two anchor rods and two bait rods) or just a variety of tackle. Move the holders lower and add pipe caps to the other holders to carry multiple jigging or bottom rods.

This cart is easy to transport, and if you have limited cargo room it is much better than the commercial cart.

And it is a lot cheaper than a pier mate for someone like me who doesn't get down out on the beach enough to justify buying one.

Enjoy!

Evan
 

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Thanks for the pictures and the detailed instructions!..I have a hand cart that I haven't used in years and will probably convert it to a beach/pier cart/:fishing:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The problem with bolts is that it removes the versatility of the setup. And enough hose clamps would break the $30 budget.

This setup has lots of room to move up, by adding better wheels, using more permanent attachments, etc. This is just the basic cart.

Evan
 

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Sweet cart - that will work. I got one pretty close to it on a light hand cart too. Wish I had made it years ago. Sorry about the pics size - off cheep cell phone camera.


<a href="http://s95.photobucket.com/albums/l154/JFord56_2006/?action=view&current=FishingCart2.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l154/JFord56_2006/FishingCart2.jpg" border="0" alt="Fishing Cart2"></a>

<a href="http://s95.photobucket.com/albums/l154/JFord56_2006/?action=view&current=FishingCart.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l154/JFord56_2006/FishingCart.jpg" border="0" alt="Fishing Cart"></a>
 

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Fishing Sleds

First of all, I don't haul crap to fishing with mine. I haul my very valuablle fishing stuf in mine. I have hauled leaves and such around the yard. It pulls better across sand than wheels.MHO

Here's link.

http://images.cabelas.com/is/image/cabelas/s7_113879_imageset_01?$main-Medium$

I got the larger one. C2
 

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First of all, I don't haul crap to fishing with mine. I haul my very valuablle fishing stuf in mine. I have hauled leaves and such around the yard. It pulls better across sand than wheels.MHO

Here's link.

http://images.cabelas.com/is/image/cabelas/s7_113879_imageset_01?$main-Medium$

I got the larger one. C2
This is very interesting. How much of a load do you pull on the beach with that thing?

Bill:fishing:
 

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Fishing minds think alike

kingfisherman23, This is a cart I made 5-6 years ago, amazing the similarities.
Hand truck by day, Pier cart by wee hours of the early morn.
This is a standard store bought hand truck, removed the stock axle,bracket, and tires, made new larger brackets, and added some old front riding mower tires I had. Hand made the folding rigging table and covered it with conveyor belt material. Added a berkley 4 rod holder on the back. Couple of bungie cord s hooks on top bar for bucket. The folding tackle box rack are spring loaded hooks cut off with 1/4 round bar hand bent in a vise and welded to the end of the hook mechanism. The big tires help when taking out on the beach.





This tube is for mounting cart to the hitch receiver, it just slides over the cart axle and pivots out of the way when not in use.

This really makes unloading quick when you get to your destination.
 

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This is very interesting. How much of a load do you pull on the beach with that thing?

Bill:fishing:
I can carry two rods, two spikes. one cooler, one tackle bag, bucket plus gaff, knife and unhooker. Bucket is used for bait or incidentals.

It pulls easily even over the crosswalks. Two seasons already and the bottom shows only minor scratches. C2
 

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Racewire20, Kingfisherman23,

Thanks a bunch for sharing the photos - nothing beats made to order!

Got a question - how well do your carts go in sand?
I have an old hand truck with wheels like Racewire20' rig I would like to setup too.
I've used a plain old garden wagon, works fine on a pier but hard to pull in sand.
Does the 2 tire setup like these work better in sand do you think?
 

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I got a big cart. 4 wheel drive. Works pretty good. Jus kidding sometimes it helps to bring wifey along to carry fishing stuff out to the beach. I know someone who used old golf bag carriers to make fishing carts. Works pretty good.
 

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Man this thread was pulled from the dark side. As for the cart pulling in sand, the biggest drawback is that when pulling it the rods tend to get in the way due to the amount of angle or lean as you are pulling it. You just have to put the longer rods on the opposite side that you will be on. It can be a little tough to drag through the sand if it is loaded down. Now as for pier use, it is great works perfect, and the tube that has been removed in the last picture allows you to carry it in your hitch receiver fully loaded, just remove the pin and fold the tube up out of your way.
 
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