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Is there anyone in the Hampton Roads area that dig up their own blood or sand worms? If so do you have any tips, hot locations, or success stories? I frequently visit Buckroe, Oceanview, and Lynnhaven piers/beach area's and Fort Monroe and Fort Eustis bases. I mention these places because I have no clue what type of environment they prefer and if people have dug some up in those places that would be grand. I can't find any help on the internet besides dated Youtube videos from other countries :rolleyes:.
 

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No sure about sandworms....

but your gonna have to go a few miles north for blood worms....uparound Maine. Pretty sure most of them come from that area.
 

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but your gonna have to go a few miles north for blood worms....uparound Maine. Pretty sure most of them come from that area.
Really? I mean fish tear up bloodworms in our waters so they have to be found in our area naturally. I could understand that they are majorly harvested further up the coast but I believe they can be found here locally. Somehow, somewhere lol.
 

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Despite the fact that fish love bloodworms, bloodworms do not naturally live in our waters as far as I know.
I don't think it would be worth your time digging for worms...perhaps sand fleas...but not worms.
 

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If you kinda put two and two together you'll notice that virginia as the title to this fourm states is blessed with waters that get both fish from the north and the deep south- blood worms have a hard time living here due to our water temps BUT HOWEVER there are VERY large grubs found our mud bottoms- flounders and trout love them and during the summer nights they will "swim"- for what reason i dont know why
 

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I call BS, I wouldnt say they were plentiful by any means but I have definitely flipped over driftwood on the shore of the elizabeth river and found bloodworms. Off of McCloud street if you want to know where.
 

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You may call BS but the fact remains. No bloodworms in VA...Sorry...
 

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From wikipedia:
- Dirty Jobs host Mike Rowe went digging for bloodworms in Maine in episode 5.2 from December 2006.
- The 1976 film Squirm featured bloodworms attacking the people of a small town.

My understanding is bloodworms live up north in Maine and possibly in exteremely low numbers in surrounding area. Sandworms used to be harvested in Maine and probably still are but in smaller numbers now. I do know they had them in Connecticut when I lived there though.
 

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I don't know about the Elizabeth River but there are sand worms in VA. They have a group mating "swim" I want to say in the late spring or early summer. One time about 10 years ago I witnessed such an event. I checked with my buddy who was a scientist working for CBF, who told me what they were and what they were up to.

They look a lot like what you buy as blood worms only a lighter color.
 

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There are May worms up in my area of the Chesapeake, they are small and at night on piers they dance around in the lights of piers, when we get bushels of oysters in at work we get what looks like small ones mixed in with the mud around the oysters.


May worms are polychaete worms that live in the mud and oyster bar debris on the bottom of the Bay and are usually called clamworms. They are only called May worms when then swarm during spawning in the month of May during the dark of the moon. There are seven species of polychaete worms in the Chesapeake Bay but the common clamworm; Nereis succinea is the most common. They can grow as large as 5”, but usually are about 2”-3” in size. They basically are very similar to the bloodworms that come from Maine that are sold for bait here in tackle shops. This time of the year the worms undergo a metamorphosis to become a special sexual form called heteronereises. They develop a reddish color and enlarged parapodia (little swimming fans) on their sides for swimming. They will swarm in a mating frenzy for several nights; mate, release their eggs and sperm then die. As these worms swim about, they present quite a treat to any fish that happen to be about. They are attracted to light, so if you can get out on a dock with a light on it, you’re in for a show. There is a species of similar worm in the Florida Keys called the palo worm that does the same thing this time of the year. This is a great time to be tarpon fishing with long reddish orange flies. Tarpon are suckers for them. It’s not hard to imagine that a smaller version would work this time of the year, here in the Chesapeake Bay for striped bass.

That was taken from: http://www.dnr.state.md.us/fisherie...rptArchive/frarchives2004/0526chesapeake.html
 

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Discussion Starter #15
thanks for that input!

There are May worms up in my area of the Chesapeake, they are small and at night on piers they dance around in the lights of piers, when we get bushels of oysters in at work we get what looks like small ones mixed in with the mud around the oysters.


May worms are polychaete worms that live in the mud and oyster bar debris on the bottom of the Bay and are usually called clamworms. They are only called May worms when then swarm during spawning in the month of May during the dark of the moon. There are seven species of polychaete worms in the Chesapeake Bay but the common clamworm; Nereis succinea is the most common. They can grow as large as 5”, but usually are about 2”-3” in size. They basically are very similar to the bloodworms that come from Maine that are sold for bait here in tackle shops. This time of the year the worms undergo a metamorphosis to become a special sexual form called heteronereises. They develop a reddish color and enlarged parapodia (little swimming fans) on their sides for swimming. They will swarm in a mating frenzy for several nights; mate, release their eggs and sperm then die. As these worms swim about, they present quite a treat to any fish that happen to be about. They are attracted to light, so if you can get out on a dock with a light on it, you’re in for a show. There is a species of similar worm in the Florida Keys called the palo worm that does the same thing this time of the year. This is a great time to be tarpon fishing with long reddish orange flies. Tarpon are suckers for them. It’s not hard to imagine that a smaller version would work this time of the year, here in the Chesapeake Bay for striped bass.

That was taken from: http://www.dnr.state.md.us/fisherie...rptArchive/frarchives2004/0526chesapeake.html
 

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I wouldnt trust anything you found in the Elizabeth River, it may be a by product of chemical reaction or a genetic mutation. That river is nasty.

I wouldnt be surprised if they also hitched a ride on a boat, similar to the zebra mussels. there are a lot of ships in the ER, one reason it is so dirty.
 

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I have cleaned the river water strainers here at Newport News Shipbuilding and pulled out hanfulls of 10 to 14 inch worms that look just like blood worms. And when I cut them to fish with they bled and also had the claws come out just like a blood worm. What they were I havent a clue, but they're good bait.
 

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Why use Bloodworms;Grass Shrimp can work just as good and they're almost free.Ive seen everything eat them Spot/White Perch love em Stripers love em,and I've caught Flounder and see them spit them out as soon as they come on board.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
not familiar with grass shrimp, unless you are speaking of general shrimp. If not, since they are almost free, how does one acquire them?

Why use Bloodworms;Grass Shrimp can work just as good and they're almost free.Ive seen everything eat them Spot/White Perch love em Stripers love em,and I've caught Flounder and see them spit them out as soon as they come on board.
 

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there are most def worms with blood inside them and claws that come out iv flipped over rocks at low tide and found them along with what i believe to be sandworms aswell and they both worked great for bait. so your answer is yes VA has worms just flip over rocks and get your free bait along with small razor clams
 
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