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Discussion Starter #1
Let's hear some cheap tricks of the trade. I think it would be cool to have a cheap tricks section of the site so let's start saying some tricks/ ideas.

I think this could benefit people if a person makes something one way, but another makes the same item a different way, which could make it a heck of a lot easier for the first person that used the item and had lots of trouble using it or it just could make their life easier.

Ideas or plans on how to make some home-made fishing tools would be cool.

Thanks, seafisher
 

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trix

well I have got two cheap trix for making carolina rigs for flounder. for beads I go to my mom/girlfriend/grandma/whoever for costume jewelry etc. which I break up for the beads, or I go to the dollar store for cheap plastic little girls beaded braclets/neclaces, the colors are usually good. for sinkers I always keep old nasty cast nets that have been ripped up and cant catch fish. these nets have about 50 1oz slip sinkers on the bottom that you can cut off. now all you need to buy is a swivel and a hook.
 

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lead

Trick one:
I use the lead on my cast net and make new molds(Heaver's web site).

Trick two
I carry alot of gold hooks.Great to use when catching pompano's,blow toads and small pups.Well since the gold hooks seem to be more pliable than the regular heavier hooks I use.I bend one out when I need to use one as a rigging needle,and I have frequently use one when I get wind knots in the braided line.I use it to pull them nasty knots out.
 

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chum

heres one on chum were talking fishing with good current so you grind all your fish rice macaroni whatever now how do you get the bait out when its frozen into the bag or pot you dont. freeze your chum in those 3-4 gal pals trick is you still need the weight to get it down so find some of those old window weights and freeze them right in with your chum now when your on the pier ,boat or bridge just take out your trusty drill and start drilling tie a rope through the holes throw it over no messy chum on you your boat , or the area your fishing because we all know how chum attracts bugs and walla no mess .another one for surf fishing take a film canister put some small holes through it fill with cotton and any kind of oil,shedder ,bunker ,shrimp better yet grind some bait and freeze the canister just attatch it with your sinker trust me sometimes they inhale the whole canister other times when blues are thick they bite them in half or take the hole deal theres a couple that i reely like!ZOOM
 

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I transport my surf rods in an old, rigid "par 3 " size golf bag.

The reels are stored in gallon size zip-lock bags, in the pockets of the golf bag.

My "Surf Gaff" is a barbless #12 hook on the end of a golf club handle. (And YOU thought Golf was a stupid game.)

The PVC sand spikes also travel in the golf bag, with the tip sections of the rods inside them for protection.

The shoulder strap on the bag frees up your hands for carrying other stuff.
 

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Another golf bag use

I have three of them that I use at home for storing my rods and reels. I put the butt ends in the bags that have the flexible material type dividers in them and I store the "tip ends" in a golf bag that has molded plastic, from top to bottom, tube type dividers. The reels go into the large pocket of each golf bag and I put my rain suit, pliers, etc... in the numerous 6 or so other pockets of each bag. Then I store the bags in a corner out of household traffic flow.

I have been tempted to carry them onto a pier, now I might just have the courage to do just that. BTW..I have the wheeled carriers for the bags as well. Other than the carriers being wide when opened, the plus is they have large wheels that will go over any pier surface whether concrete or wooden boards spaced apart, such as Harrison's.

Having a tilting ledge mounted to the wheeled carriers would allow one to carry coolers onto piers. The large wheels are good for going over boards that are spaced apart, such as with Harrison's.

All bags with their wheeled carriers were purchased at flea markets or yard sales for 5 bucks or less.


8(---)
 

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Eels

I learned this up on Martha's Vineyard a long time ago.

When useing elvers (little eels) as bait for stripers. It's important to have "live" eels. The problem is that they give off huge amounts of glue-like slime. You need to transport them in a bucket, but if you leave them in the bucket they will drown in thier own slime. You often have to drive around the island, until you find the fish. Making it impractical to take your elvers in and out of the bucket, and NO a regular minnow bucket won't work. (The holes are too big.)

The solution is. to take a 1 to 2 gallon plastic container with a tight fitting lid. (And YOU thought tupperware was useless.) With a knife, make SLITS, not HOLES in the top. ( Those little guys can get thru a good sized nail hole.)

Transport your elvers in the upright position, but when you get to the fishing grounds, keep your eel bucket upside down so the slime can constantly drain away.

You can keep eels alive for days in this fashion.

If you try to keep them from one trip to the next, keep the bucket inverted, in the shade with a heavy weight on top.

Cats and Racoons love Sushi.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Keep on posting guys.

I put up a post a while back about to make a good rigging needle with a clothes hanger.

Also, reel covers can be made by just putting your worn out sock over your reels and rubber-banding the sock to keep it on.
 

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El Cheapo!

Don't but lures for $5, buy the components and assemble them yourself. Unless you can find them in the discount bin at Sports Authority for $2.

Look around when you are fishing. Chances are someone fished there recently and left something. I find all kinds of stuff.

Definately make your own sandspikes.

Catch your own bait and tie your own Hi/Lo rigs.

The number one way to save $$ is to Not lend your good reel to someone who lays it in the sand and then rinses the sand off in the saltwater, everytime they re-bait. :mad:
 

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Reel Bags

Noticed a couple of guys mentioning zip lock bags for your reels. Bad idea. They will not breathe and allow any mositure in or on the reel to evaporate. This will start the corrison process much quicker than just leaving them loose.

Crown Royal bags are AOK. :)
 

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Re: El Cheapo!

OldBay said:
...Never lend your good reel to someone who lays it in the sand and then rinses the sand off in the saltwater, everytime they re-bait. :mad:
Roger that!
 

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I sometimes tie my own bucktails;I lose a dozen or more at Indian River Inlet:mad: .I snell my own hooks on my homeade rigs;Use foodsaver bags to keep bait fresh.Thats all I can think of;)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thats why when ever I loan someone a reel, its the cheap one. Good idea, Fish Hunter. Thats another reason I use the socks.

Keep on postin y'all.
 

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If my reel ever falls in the sand a rinse in saltwater;then a better rinse when I get home with high presured freshwater and most of the time my reels survive;)
 

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Hints and Tips C/O


http://home.cfl.rr.com/floridafishing/main.htm

If fishing from a boat buy a waterproof Sportsman Dry Box, K-mart and Wal-Mart carry them, to keep your wallet, important papers, flares, sounding device and camera in.

When fishing unfamiliar waters get a map of the area, Top Spots Maps are great, and study it before the trip. In this way you can eliminate many unproductive areas and concentrate on the areas that look like fish producers.

Use a hot butter-knife to melt the plastic back together on your tore-up plastic lures.

Carry a tube of super glue in your tackle box and use a small drop to also repair plastic baits.

To keep your fishing maps from being destroyed. Cover both sides with clear contact paper. This makes them waterproof, and allows you to mark choice locations with waterproof grease pencil. Use a dry cloth to wipe off the markings later.

Done flossing! Use the cutter from a floss container, to cut threw those new braided lines.

If you get a leak in your waders. Find the hole. Melt a plastic worm and smear the goo onto the hole, inside and out. Now you can get back to fishing, and enjoy the rest of your day.

Looking for small screws for quick reel repairs. Look no further than a cassette tape. The screws are usually the right size.

Keep track of your split shots by putting them in a empty breath mint box. Write the size on the outside for easier identification.

When walking through tick country on your way to a favorite fishin' hole. Wrap duct tape around your pant cuffs to seal out the bugs.

When portaging a canoe to remote locations, bring along a mesh fruit or onion sack. (grapefruit, oranges, onions) and a length of rope. You can fill the bag with rocks and tie it to the end of the rope. Now you have a portable anchor.

When your crankbaits get damaged or punctured fix then with no chip, top-coat (clear) nail polish. Fill the hole or scratch with polish. Let dry then give two or three more coats to attain a smooth surface. Your bait is back in business.

Safety pins help keep things together. Slide spare blades, hooks, swivels and the like onto the pin, and snap the pin shut. Now you don't have to worry about them scattering all over your tackle box.

Put a drop of hot glue onto the eyelet of your stinger hooks. Slide it onto your spinnerbait, jig or buzzer. You hook will stay in place all day.

Use an outdoor digital thermometer, the kind with the 10-12 foot lead. Drop the probe down and you can measure the water temp down to 10 or so feet, instead of just at the surface.

Use glittered fabric paints to jazz up your baits.

Use your local bait fish as a guide to size and color selection for your lures.

Using a lighter test fishing line can help improve the fish strikes.

Sharpen hooks just before use for more positive hookups.

Varying the retrieve speed or combining a quick retrieve with a pause to let the lure sink a few feet down in the water before continuing the retrieve can stimulate more strikes.

You may wish to replace the treble hooks with heavy duty double hooks when going for big fish.

A different lure presentation (size or type) from what is normally used in a particular area can also help improve the fish strikes.

Always store your reels with the drag set at no tension (free spool) or as low as it can go. This will prevent flat spots on drag material. You can set the clicker to "On" to prevent the reel from turning and line unwinding.

Rod Tip: Take the male end of the ferrule and rub it along side your nose before putting the rod together. The oil from your skin/nose will put a light lube on the joint where the two rod parts come together, making it easy to pull apart.

If you're having a hard time getting a rod apart because the joint or ferrule is stuck together, try this. Sit down and lay the rod across your lap with the ferrule centered between your legs. Take your hands and grasp the top and bottom of the rod on the outside of your legs. Hold on tight to the rod, keeping your hands below the top of your legs and slowly move your legs apart, pulling the rod apart at the same time!

Tuning a crank bait or diving plug: Most diving plugs right out of the package don't catch fish. Some do, but most don't, they need to be tuned. Tie the plug on as recommended by the manufacturer. Usually a snap (not snap swivel) or an open loop knot is best. Once tied on, let out a few feet of line and pull the plug through the water at the rate that you will be trolling or retrieving the plug. Make sure you can see the plug in the water. It needs to run straight, perfectly straight! If it turns on its right side, turn the clasp on the plug to the left. If it runs left, turn the clasp right. You won't need to turn the clasp much to make the adjustments. Keep pulling the plug through the water and making adjustments, make it run straight as an arrow. Test your plugs after catching a fish or getting snagged, both of these things can make a plug run out of tune. You'll hook more fish with a finely tuned plug, take the time and do it. The pro's do.

Finding a leak in waders: Take one end of the hose from a vacuum and put it in the exhaust of the vacuum. Now take the other end and put it into the waders. Now close the top of the waders around the hose, blowing the waders up like a balloon. Take a spray bottle with soapy water in it and spray the area of the leak. Bubbles will appear at the leak. Mark the spot, let the area dry, and patch with a sealer.

After you have those hooks sharpened to a razor sharp point simply take a black permanent marker and color the tip from the point to just below the barb. By doing this it will help in preventing rust. Thus prolonging the life and edge of your hooks.

If you happen to get poked by a catfish fin, such as the dorsal or pectoral fin of a hardhead (sea catfish), I can guarantee you some serious pain!! As soon as it happens, rub some of the slime from the fish's belly/body into your wound. And if you have any Asprin or Tylenol handy, take a couple! You will get very Numb around the wound for about an hour or so, but the slime should keep you from getting infected. The slime is a NATURAL ANTIDOTE for the bacteria. If the Dorsal or Pectoral fin has broken off in you, Stop fishing and get to a clinic or Hospital IMMEDIATELY and have it removed.

Having trouble keeping those trout floats on your line. Simply place a thick rubber band through the slot before putting the line in. Then put the stick in the float as you normally would. This improves the friction and keeps the float where you want it.

Hope it helps someone out.
The catfish one helped me out.
 

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Dang

Dang Kozlow, you the Martha Stewart of the fishing world? 8(---)

You got a good list there. Several new ones for me.

Thanks.

One more on my end.

To prevent those backlashes from burying deep into the spool, take your best cast and then put a small piece of masking tape across the spool. If you backlash, then it stops at that point. If you have a better than normal cast, the tape pops off and no damage done.
 

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not really a trick but fishing lynnhaven inlet can get you tackle. Last time i went there i picked up one decent look rig, a fish finder, and a jighead with a trailer. Normally u can snag some good things there, its true to i swear it is.
 

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yea ditto fishinkid, extreme lowtide at most spots is tackle collecting time. jetties are great for this
 
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