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I've been experimenting with braid on surf rods since 2008 or so, and still can't decide the right answer. Initially I was all in on braid, and used nothing else. That changed in the last couple of years.
Some of my big reels (Saltist/Slosh 20s/30s) are loaded with straight 50 pound braid. Some have 30 pound braid backing, topped with enough 17lb mono that I can't cast it all off (so ~120 yards, I'm a poor caster). My lighter reels the whiting/pompano stuff, are mostly spinners loaded with 10-12lb mono or 15-20lb braid.

When it's really nasty out -- lots of wind and current -- I mostly fish mono. Otherwise, I like the sensitivity and castability of braid.

Backlashes suck regardless of line type, but I honestly think I'm more successful recovering from those with braid -- as long as it doesn't zing-pow mid-cast.
 

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For the past five years, 90% of my surf fishing has been done with braid, usually 30lb test on a Penn Squall 12 or Penn Fathom 12. On the Squall I have the mags set a 50% and on the Fathom the centrifugal brakes are set with three out of six engaged.I cast far and hard and have not had a much of a problem with backlashes. Most of my casts are off-the-ground but I have used the Hatteras cast and the pendulum cast (though I don't really have that one figured out yet.)

I am not sure if it casts that much farther than mono because I just no longer use mono enough to make a comparison. The only time I use mono with a conventional is when drum fishing at the point. I prefer braid over mono for the following reasons. (1) much greater sensitivity at detecting bites; (2) I can use a smaller lighter reel; (3) unlike mono, braid doesn't wear out (except for the occasional need to cut the end back a few feet; and (4) it gets very good distance, probably more for me that when using 17lb test mono. I have had backlashes but I am usually able to clear them. I will say that braid is less forgiving and once a reel starts to go south mid-cast, it is hard to correct. To me the above benefits are worth it. Tom
 

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What I've found with braid, in the test ranges I typically use, is that I don't get a drop in resistance to wind and current proportional to the drop in diameter. So if I replace 20-30lb mono with 10-20lb braid, I'm still getting the equivalent resistance on the braid as the 20lb mono. For me, mono seems to be more slippery, especially in the water, and resistant to getting moved around. And in a surf or current situation, that can be the critical factor.

I'm not typically trying to cast to the Bahamas and I'm not trying to squeeze out that last 15-20 yards, and most of the surf fishing that I do doesn't really abrade my line, so all in all, mono more than satisfies my needs. If I was fishing pilings or oyster beds then I'd probably think differently, but for me it doesn't justify the cost.
 

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Braid on a revolver for distance? Well, give it a go and see for yerself. For me, ALWAYS good mono like Sakuma. You might find out why mono's my choice if you do spool up with braid. :)
 
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