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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Time to upgrade as everything I have has leaks, and has already been patched .

Looking to go neoprene as I have been doing more cold water late/early season mountain stream fishing.

I've been reading the pros and cons online, but thought I'd solicite some advice from guys who I know fish.

I've only ever had bootfoot hip and chest waders. The stocking foot seem nice but is there a good reason I should buy waders that cost more in general, and then buy boots to cover them?

I'm not a stunning male model on the water and prefer function over form so I'm not partial to any particular brand...that being said I just got some birthday Bass Pro gift cards so I'll probably be shopping there.

Any suggestions?
 

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I've had both. I do a lot of trout fishing and have found that the stocking foot with boots gives much better traction, with felt sole boots that is. The boot foot style is slick as snot on our streams around here in the Shenandoah valley. I use my waders with felt sole boots at the beach all the time and they do great.
 

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For surf fishing in colder weather, I use boot foot breathable waders. For my fresh water trout fishing I use gore tex breathable stocking foot , with a good pair of wading shoe's. Kracka is right you get better ankle support with them, you need that in streams with rocky bottoms. I have a pair of neoprene stocking foot waders, and have not used them for a couple of years. I layer up under my breathable's and i'm much more comfortable than when i used the neoprene waders. Plus you don't get clamy from the sweat in the breatable waders. good luck.
 

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Not sure what state your in, but I think MD still bans felt soles on the boots. I had a set of Frogg Toggs Canyons with felt soles that I used on a frozen dock last striper season, and the traction was unbelievable. A little over 6months into ownership, they leaked and I had to return them to Frogg Toggs. They replaced them with some Sierran stocking foot, and some Aransas boots. I haven't had the chance to use the new set yet. Frogg Toggs stepped up and covered their product, so I like them for that. I just had to pay for return shipping - about $20.

Here's a link about where felt soles are illegal - but its from 2011.
http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news...011-04-28-rock-snot-felt-sole-wader-ban_n.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Interesting about the banned felt soles, I would have never thought about them transporting invasive critters.

I'll Be useing these primarily in Pennsylvania streams. And while I have read the felt soles are great in the water I have also read that on the banks they can freeze up with ice and mud making them heavy and slippery. Although apparently you can screw in some lugs to help with the slippery part.


I'll have to look at the breathable ones too...I forgot about them.
 

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Interesting about the banned felt soles, I would have never thought about them transporting invasive critters.

I'll Be useing these primarily in Pennsylvania streams. And while I have read the felt soles are great in the water I have also read that on the banks they can freeze up with ice and mud making them heavy and slippery. Although apparently you can screw in some lugs to help with the slippery part. I'll have to look at the breathable ones too...I forgot about them.
Stockingfoot breathable chest waders are the way to go! I use mine in the Winter fishing Western Maryland streams/rivers so they will work for you there too.

Couple of items of concern are:

- Make sure to get your wading boots with rubber bottoms and with screw in cleats. Cabelas has a great pair of lightweight ones that I have. Screw in cleats are the cheapest way to make sure you have solid footing (compared to strap on Korkers which work great but can be pricey)

- Most stockingfoot waders have their foot section made of neoprene. You'll need to make sure you order your wading boots at least 1 size larger to accommodate them or 2 sizes larger if you want to wear heavy socks for colder weather

- Neoprene waders are great for colder weather but tend to get very warm inside (increasing moisture can freeze you in the Winter) if you do any extended walking - like to and from the stream. You have to be very careful not to exert yourself or you will freeze to death in them. Been there - done that. I have a pair that i use in the surf while surf fishing though.

- If you wade rocky streams or rivers you should also invest in a wading staff. Lots of them out there. I have a Folstaf (brand) which folds up and fits in a leather case attached to my wading belt. If you get a Folstaf, make sure you get the longest one they sell and the largest diameter staff (think is is 1/2" vice 3/8"). It will be pricey but they last forever and do repair their them if needed.

- Check your state laws - more and more states are outlawing felt...

- If you get the stockingfoot style with wading boots, you can use the boots for summertime wet wading!

PM me if you need additional info on wading rocky streams or rivers...

Sandcrab
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Stockingfoot breathable chest waders are the way to go! I use mine in the Winter fishing Western Maryland streams/rivers so they will work for you there too.

- Neoprene waders are great for colder weather but tend to get very warm inside (increasing moisture can freeze you in the Winter) if you do any extended walking - like to and from the stream. You have to be very careful not to exert yourself or you will freeze to death in them. Been there - done that. I have a pair that i use in the surf while surf fishing though.

Sandcrab
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Sandcrab, a suggestion for you: get some polypropylene long johns (or Under Armor $$). They will wick the moisture off your skin and keep you from freezing at night after exerting yourself earlier.
 

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If you do go the Stocking-foot route, make sure to take a look at the Korkers line of Wading Boots.
They have a model that has an interchangeable - snap-on sole system that can be changed back and forth between hard cleats and a felt sole.
Brilliant in my estimation, and by far the most comfortable set of wading boots I have ever had.
Not cheap, but cheaper than two pair!
TjB
 

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If you do go the Stocking-foot route, make sure to take a look at the Korkers line of Wading Boots.
They have a model that has an interchangeable - snap-on sole system that can be changed back and forth between hard cleats and a felt sole.
Brilliant in my estimation, and by far the most comfortable set of wading boots I have ever had.
Not cheap, but cheaper than two pair!
TjB
I agree with TJB on this one. I have been using Korkers for the last 20 years. I buy the slip on sandal style. They buckle on over your boot foot or wadeing boat. they have replacable cleats. They also work great on ice , and on roof tops with very steep angles. My son does roofing on the side, came home one day ,could not find my Korkers, wife said "Zach took them to work with him.
A little pricey up front but worth it.
 

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i fish mostly trout streams in VA but love breathable stockingfoot with good wading boots, just layer like crazy underneath the waders when it gets cold.
 

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Stocking foot provides more flexibility by changing boot styles or the korkers. I think the felt soles are easier on your truck floorboard and other floors as well as having good traction on slippery rocks.
T
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Is getting stuff. ie. Rocks / sand in the boots and wearing holes in the stocking foot a problem?
 

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stocking foot/boot foot are both good for the reasons mentioned but I now use boot foot exclusively for one reason........neoprene stocking foot waders are a bear to take off.
I have trouble with my back and boot foot just slide on and off easily.....stocking foot have to be wrestled off.

plus like surffshr stated in the surf stocking foot even with gravel guards let sand get in and then they become very uncomfortable
 

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If you're fishing lots of cold water in winter I'd go with neoprenes. They're a pain to get on and off but they'll keep you toasty. But with the decline of the striper fishery I don't do as much November/December fishing as I used to. I'm mostly in waders in spring and fall, which means breathables with stockingfeet paired with Worldwide Sportsman Flats Boots, available at Bass Pro for about 30 bucks. And another downside to the bootfoot waders is they're very heavy. If you get rolled in a pounding surf you could get in serious trouble.
 

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For me the main reason I went to neo's when they first came out. Safety, went to a local indoor pool. We put on neo's and jumped in. If you don't panic you can stay afloat and even swim alittle and take on very little water. The water you take in your body temp warms up. The others will fill with water. If you get a chance and going to fish alot in waders. Find a way to get in a pool with them, have resuce available
 

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If you're fishing lots of cold water in winter I'd go with neoprenes. They're a pain to get on and off but they'll keep you toasty. But with the decline of the striper fishery I don't do as much November/December fishing as I used to. I'm mostly in waders in spring and fall, which means breathables with stockingfeet paired with Worldwide Sportsman Flats Boots, available at Bass Pro for about 30 bucks. And another downside to the bootfoot waders is they're very heavy. If you get rolled in a pounding surf you could get in serious trouble.
I can FULLY IDENTIFY with getting rolled in a pounding surf. Happened to me on Ocracoke last spring. Thankfully I had a good wading belt around my waist and didn't really get any water down the legs. It's no fun trying to stand up in the rolling surf when your waders are full of water. So I always, ALWAYS wear a wading belt of some sort. Gives you a good place to hang a towel, pliers, etc. Oh, and I use stockingfoot breathables.
 
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