More Bad News for the East Coast and Bluefish - Page 2
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Thread: More Bad News for the East Coast and Bluefish

  1. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Jersey
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    2,238
    Quote Originally Posted by 40inchreds View Post
    I'm waiting on good weather to give it a try for some Sandbars, sand tigers, whites, dusky and the not so known about winter hammer. You really don't know what you will catch since it's kind of a unfished fishery. I just need a day where it's not blowing 10 plus and 2ft plus waves/chop and 50 degree water and air because it takes like 30 minutes to drop a bait to my favorite spot and it's one thing to get your ass kicked but it totally sucks to get your ass kicked, freeze and catch nothing. I have a feeling 2 of the 3 can be avoided. When I get a few days of good weather leading into a day I can fish I'm gonna yak out some baits and do some winter surf fishing. How cold of water have you seen good size sharks caught up there?
    The Sand Bars hang out on the beach at Cape Point all winter long. Water Temps drop into the low 50's unless it gets really cold. No need to yak at Cape Point, just chuck a big bait out in a cut or over the bar with a heaver and it will happen. Seven or Eight Foot Sand Bar on 20 pound test line is all the Shark I need Hooked a few that refused to even show themselves or slow down. Most often a Sand Bar will jump at the Hook set, kind of surprising sometimes how shallow and close they will be. Once I underhanded a head from a 7 or 8 pound Jumping Mullet in the first trough off the sand. I was talking trash to the Red Head and knew a hit was on the way... Took all of ten minutes to have a monster on. Brought around 300 five to eight footers to the beach winter of 2017. Got stripped ten or so times by the larger ones. I kept trying for a Winter Drum and I kept getting Slammed. I also had to retire two Daiwa SHV reels that got toasted. Daiwa should send me some new ones and I will demo them on Hammers.....

    In winter I have a few good spots to cast net Big Mullet, you have to do it in the dark with a big net.

    No one was yaking that Winter, it would have been a sure thing to have the Sharks either hit the yak directly or at least breach on it as soon as it crossed the bar. A lot of days it was splash bite.....they were stacked up

    Suckers are there waiting in the Hook Tonight looking for Christmas Dinner right as I type, yak on out
    Last edited by Garboman; 12-24-2019 at 05:31 PM.

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  3. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Charleston sc
    Posts
    67
    Down where I'm at our sand bars don't jump but they fight hard. A 8ft sandbar on 20# is a achievement. My biggest sand bar is about 7ft. I know they can get to 9 but it's rare. Sand bars are actually pretty cool, they can tuck there fins a little and slime there body to swim faster and can stick there fins out to produce more lift when swimming slower. Most the Sandbars I catch are on a lot heavier then 20# but they give one good first run and then hold and swim side to side, they are pretty sporty.
    The biggest I know of being caught in my area was 99 inches tail length. Some of them get pretty fat. My buddy caught a 9ft sandtiger and it was fat as hell, probably 300-350lbs. A lot of people don't know about the cool water hammers. They are the Carolina hammer and we're only classified a few years ago. They look exactly like another hammer head, I can't remember off the top of my head if it's the smooth or scalloped but they have different behavior patterns and tolerate cooler waters very well. The only way to tell them apart is by the number of vertabrates. I've caught the baby's in the 3ft range in 56-58 degree water in the spring. The thing about cool water sharks is they have to stay active to keep there body temps up which means they have to feed a lot more from all the extra activity that speeds up there metabolism. Majority of the time if they are around they will eat. I've never specifically sharked fished in the winter but we did a trip on warm foggy night in the end of February and paddling out with the headlamp in the dark was hard because your breath would get caught in the light and you could only see your breath and the foggy moist air made it way worse. To top it off conditions were way worse then forecast and the waves were 2-3 ft and of course I must of ran into that one wave you read about on forecast that can be 2 to 3 times the size of a normal wave in a 24 hr period. My breath whited out my view and then I'm staring at a huge wave/swell that's the top is creating over on itself and about to form into a big curler. The tip crest on me and the whole wave creat right as I got over it. It sounded thunderous and if I would of been about a half second behind where I was I would of got demolished in the dark of night when it was so foggy you couldn't see 30ft with a spot light. No body got a hit but we weren't at my secret spot and fishing can be hit or miss. That was the only trip I've done in the winter specifically for sharks. But I've heard sandbars are catchable in cool waters.

  4. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Jersey
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    2,238
    Quote Originally Posted by 40inchreds View Post
    Down where I'm at our sand bars don't jump but they fight hard. A 8ft sandbar on 20# is a achievement. My biggest sand bar is about 7ft. I know they can get to 9 but it's rare. Sand bars are actually pretty cool, they can tuck there fins a little and slime there body to swim faster and can stick there fins out to produce more lift when swimming slower. Most the Sandbars I catch are on a lot heavier then 20# but they give one good first run and then hold and swim side to side, they are pretty sporty.
    The biggest I know of being caught in my area was 99 inches tail length. Some of them get pretty fat. My buddy caught a 9ft sandtiger and it was fat as hell, probably 300-350lbs. A lot of people don't know about the cool water hammers. They are the Carolina hammer and we're only classified a few years ago. They look exactly like another hammer head, I can't remember off the top of my head if it's the smooth or scalloped but they have different behavior patterns and tolerate cooler waters very well. The only way to tell them apart is by the number of vertabrates. I've caught the baby's in the 3ft range in 56-58 degree water in the spring. The thing about cool water sharks is they have to stay active to keep there body temps up which means they have to feed a lot more from all the extra activity that speeds up there metabolism. Majority of the time if they are around they will eat. I've never specifically sharked fished in the winter but we did a trip on warm foggy night in the end of February and paddling out with the headlamp in the dark was hard because your breath would get caught in the light and you could only see your breath and the foggy moist air made it way worse. To top it off conditions were way worse then forecast and the waves were 2-3 ft and of course I must of ran into that one wave you read about on forecast that can be 2 to 3 times the size of a normal wave in a 24 hr period. My breath whited out my view and then I'm staring at a huge wave/swell that's the top is creating over on itself and about to form into a big curler. The tip crest on me and the whole wave creat right as I got over it. It sounded thunderous and if I would of been about a half second behind where I was I would of got demolished in the dark of night when it was so foggy you couldn't see 30ft with a spot light. No body got a hit but we weren't at my secret spot and fishing can be hit or miss. That was the only trip I've done in the winter specifically for sharks. But I've heard sandbars are catchable in cool waters.
    Sand Bars and Black Tips and Spinners often jump in shallow water as soon as they feel the hook.

    Hammerheads start to migrate down from up North in November at Cape Point. Often they cruise right on the first drop off on the beach in shallow water, I think they are targeting Flounder and Rays. I saw a National Geographic show that had a researcher based in Hawaii. The Hammerhead uses electric impulses similar to sonar, each end of his Hammerhead sends out a pulse to locate Rays hidden under the sand. Like a prehistoric metal detector. Swims around pulsing until presto it nails a hidden Flounder or Ray.

    I am not a Sharker, but I encounter them as by-catch for Drum.

    As stated in previous posts, I break them off at the shock line, and do not beach them for my safety and for safety of the Shark.

    Right now the Sharks will be thick at the Point, happens every Christmas, they hang out until Spring and when the water gets too warm for them the Black Tips and Spinners take over. Point is one Sharky place, if it is hot and I have to take a dip, it is not for long and I certainly do not swim out far.
    Last edited by Garboman; 12-25-2019 at 10:35 AM.

  5. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Charleston sc
    Posts
    67
    Our tippers and spinners jump but all sharks can jump. The big tippers usually jump but not like the spinners.
    I hooked what we think was a white once and it jumped in front of a mid size center console and was at least eight foot long and was higher in the air then the guy's head standing up driving the center console, it could of been closer to 12 depending the size of these guys boat because it was around half the length of it or more and the boat was at minimum a 18ftr. It was several hundred yards away so I couldnt get a solid ID on it but it looked like a white to me. I've seen videos of sand tigers jumping and they are known as the least athletic shark. Supposedly the hammerheads head helps them pin down Ray's and eat them. I know the greater hammerheads are known to follow schools of blacktips and cownose Ray's. Every winter we have smaller mid size dolphins wash up bit in half. I beach the shark and tag them and I've had a few recaptures reported already so I know that I'm handling them ok. I have all my release gear and tags ready to go and if it takes longer to dehook then I want I release them without tagging or taking a photo. I file down my Barb's so dehooking is easier and use heavy gear to shorten the fight time and I leave them in shallow water when doing so. That's a 8'4 tiger I caught this October.
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  6. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Wilmington
    Posts
    2,787
    If you really wanna catch sharks, go out for drum or grouper....... For rays go for Cobia........works like a champ, ask my back and burnt up TLD 25

  7. #31
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    DC, but I fish from SC to MD. Primarily saltwater, but I'm originally a freshwater fisherman from PA (Erie, Pymatuming, Raystown and all the rivers).
    Posts
    365
    Limit of 3 is cheesy (and stupid) for shore fishermen...especially when you drive a long distance to get to the ocean. They should implement regulation similar to that they use for stripers (slot size) and put the daily limit at 5 - 7 fish. Probably not as much time and effort has been put into studying the bluefish population (like they do stripers). I eat the ones I catch, occasionally using one for cut bait to catch other blues, but only if I don't have a Spot that I'm already using for cut bait. I don't think I've ever kept over 10 bluefish in my life. I also haven't seen any bluefish over 10lbs recently. They've all been in the snapper blue range in the bay.

  8. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    18
    Bluefish are good to eat if you know what you are doing. You have to bleed bluefish as soon as you catch them, cut into the bottom of the fish under the gills, put it directly on ice. You also want to take the skin and blood line out when you filet. Breaded and fried is the only way I will eat blues. The fresher the fish, the better. Bluefish go bad really fast and should be eaten as soon as possible.

  9. #33
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    chesapeake,fentress area
    Posts
    2,248
    Even the big ones fry up good too if they're bled and cleaned right away like you stated.

    Chunked then fried with Tampura batter makes great Blue Bites ...

  10. #34
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Hanover, Va.
    Posts
    1,428
    Quote From CCA

    Managers have stated that the data on bluefish, both scientific and anecdotal, indicates that a reduction in harvest is necessary to increase the spawning stock biomass and end the overfished state. However, the reductions recommended by the MAFMC and approved by the ASMFC, on top of other recent major changes to limits in North Carolina, such as estuarine striped bass and Southern flounder closures, pose a significant challenge for recreational anglers. Many anglers in North Carolina are rightfully frustrated with the state of our fisheries, largely the result of bias - real or perceived - by fisheries managers in favor of unsustainable commercial fisheries until drastic conservation action is necessary.

    In the case of bluefish, the reduction from 15 to three is a shock to most anglers and it is particularly frustrating given that managers for years have regularly shifted un-caught recreational bluefish quota to the commercial sector because commercial harvesters had caught all of its allocation. If those fish had been allowed to remain extant in the system rather than shifted to the commercial sector and removed, it is likely the fishery would not be in need of dire restrictions today.

  11. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Todd, Pa.
    Posts
    596
    Quote Originally Posted by surffshr View Post
    Quote From CCA

    Managers have stated that the data on bluefish, both scientific and anecdotal, indicates that a reduction in harvest is necessary to increase the spawning stock biomass and end the overfished state. However, the reductions recommended by the MAFMC and approved by the ASMFC, on top of other recent major changes to limits in North Carolina, such as estuarine striped bass and Southern flounder closures, pose a significant challenge for recreational anglers. Many anglers in North Carolina are rightfully frustrated with the state of our fisheries, largely the result of bias - real or perceived - by fisheries managers in favor of unsustainable commercial fisheries until drastic conservation action is necessary.

    In the case of bluefish, the reduction from 15 to three is a shock to most anglers and it is particularly frustrating given that managers for years have regularly shifted un-caught recreational bluefish quota to the commercial sector because commercial harvesters had caught all of its allocation. If those fish had been allowed to remain extant in the system rather than shifted to the commercial sector and removed, it is likely the fishery would not be in need of dire restrictions today.
    I agree.

  12. #36
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Cape ChaRLES, va
    Posts
    4
    " If those fish had been allowed to remain extant in the system rather than shifted to the commercial sector and removed, it is likely the fishery would not be in need of dire restrictions today."

    And you expect common sense from a govt agency?

    Sorry, not gonna happen.

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