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Thread: how to cook spot

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    va bch
    Posts
    132

    how to cook spot

    cant find any ways to cook these bad boys i never had them so i figure i would try them out what is a good way to cook them

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Posts
    6

    cooking spot ...

    Clean them up, fillet, and fry them babies up,
    RECIPES

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Norfolk
    Posts
    663
    Egg wash, House Autry breading, and add a little old bay to the breading and fry em up!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Norfolk, VA
    Posts
    579
    Personally I fry them whole. I bleed them at the beach/pier, then when I get home I scale them, cut the head, the tail, and the back spines off, then gut them and wash out the stomach cavity.

    Then dip them in some egg like adp29934 said above, roll them in a flour/cornmeal/salt/pepper/oldbay mix, and fry them up. I personally like doing it this way since I can easily pull the backbone and 98-100% of the ribs out once it's cooked. If I've got a couple really big croaker I might fillet them, but since spot never really get all that big I just go ahead and cook them whole.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    the 757
    Posts
    8,622
    Personally I fry them whole
    Scale, cut and save the heads or give em to me, trim fins, spines and tail. Fillet from the back ( butterfly ) and clean out the guts.

    I pre-season the butterfly'ed fillets on large cookie sheets. Skin side down Salt, pepper, a lot of garlic powder and a dash of ceyenne pepper.

    In a seperate large bowl or pan, get your corn bread ready. I like to do this outside as corn bread gets a little dusty. I like to add a little sugar to the dry mix.

    Crack and scramble 2-3 large eggs in a bowl ( egg wash ).

    Assembly your fillets to be dipped in the egg wash and then into the corn meal. Get the peanut oil ready in a large deep cast iron skillet. Heat to 300 - 325 degrees. Keep a cooking thermometer around.

    Fry fillets until floating or golden brown. I like my spot crunchy so I keep em swimmin in the oil for a little bit longer.

    I layer old newspapers or brown paper bags in a large deep baking pan to absorb any oil from the fried fillets.

    Season some apple cider or white vinegar with some freshly crushed garlic cloves and 1 small habenero or jalepeno pepper.

    Call some friends or family over and enjoy the feast!.. BTW any left over corn meal turns into fried onion hush puppies or hush puppy pancakes to along with the spot!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Murrells Inlet, SC
    Posts
    166
    I fillet & skin everything I catch. Toss them in milk, then a 50/50 mix of corn meal & flour, with some Season All & black pepper in bag. Shake well & deep fry.
    Make a batch of hush puppies after fish is cooked.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    150
    Gee, Smoldrn, doesn't that get boring after awhile?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    106
    I bet they would be good scaled/headed/gutted them seasoned and smoked.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Baltimore City
    Posts
    728

    I prefer to...

    Quote Originally Posted by ORF Pete View Post
    Personally I fry them whole. I bleed them at the beach/pier, then when I get home I scale them, cut the head, the tail, and the back spines off, then gut them and wash out the stomach cavity.

    Then dip them in some egg like adp29934 said above, roll them in a flour/cornmeal/salt/pepper/oldbay mix, and fry them up. I personally like doing it this way since I can easily pull the backbone and 98-100% of the ribs out once it's cooked. If I've got a couple really big croaker I might fillet them, but since spot never really get all that big I just go ahead and cook them whole.
    ...leave the fins on. If you cut them off, you still have the fin "roots" (bones) inside the fish. Leave them on, and after cooking you grab the fin from the tail end and pull up toward the head. The fin will easily come off - roots and all. It also leaves you with a slit for easier fork entry.


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