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Thread: Difference between the 2 styles of conventional reels?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    Lynchburg, VA
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    Difference between the 2 styles of conventional reels?

    Another newbie question for you guys. I'm new to learning about conventional reels. I see the two different styles as I'm looking around at them and am really not sure what the difference is...

    It seems that the term baitcasting is thrown at different reels. I can't seem to make heads or tails as what the difference is, if any, between a baitcaster and a conventional reel. For awhile I thought these terms were interchangeable, now I'm not so sure.... Then you also just have the term "casting reel" out there. The BPS website has them broken into 2 categories, Baitcast & Conventional. So what gives?

    Then you also have the 2 different styles. The round, open-faced style and the .... oblong style? You probably know what I mean, but here are a couple pics:

    Round


    Oblong


    How are these different if they are both conventional/baitcast reels? (Not these reels specifically, just the styles in general)

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    east coast
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    26
    Round- more capacity and drag, usually stronger built, classic design

    Oblong- lures, bass fishing, bass fishing, lower line capacity, bass fishing

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
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    Raleigh, NC
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    2,276
    I'm not sure about the whole breakdown between conventional and baitcasting. When the term "Conventional" is used I tend to think of heavier-duty reels built for heavier fish. Anything round and without a levelwind, in my mind, counts as a conventional. This is just my opinion! Of course there are exceptions to every rule, and there are plenty of reels with levelwinds that are conventionals. The Penn GTI is one that springs to mind.

    Now between "oblong" (or "low-profile," as it is often called) and round reels? The way they sit on the rod. Low profile reels also tend to have levelwinds and are made for shorter casts and freshwater/inshore fishing. Round reels sit higher off the rod.

    Evan

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    South Florida
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    In my opinion any baitcasting reel is a reel used for light inshore or freshwater fishing. For example some surf anglers call the big abus baitcasters since they are doing long casting in the surf, but in my opinion the saltwater abus are conventional. The smaller abus that are used for freshwater whether round or low profile are baitcasters!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Florida
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    991

    Conventional

    I think the term 'conventional' came about when spinning reels were first introduced to differentiate one from the others; spinning and Alvey up to that time..

    I didn't quite realize how old I really am; I predate the spinning reel.

    Until the so-called' low profile reels came along, everything was just 'thumbbusters' or 'casting' reels. Many local terminology described them. Everything else was a spincaster and a true spinning reel, I don't know what you'd call an Alvey?

    There was a difference between deep sea reels and freshwater reels, both spinning and casting.

    I would spend too much time pondering it. Go 10 miles and something will cahng. JMHO C2

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Southeast Florida
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    The term "baitcaster" is applied pretty loosely. My Shimano SpeeMaster III, Abu 7000 & 5600 and Pinnacle Sentara are all classed as baitcasters by their manufacturers. The SpeedMaster holds 360yds of 20# and the Pinnacle 160 of 12#. Big difference.

    The Low Profile baitcasters are more intended for throwing crankbaits, swimbaits and jigs, which you tend to "work" back to you.

    Therefore the frame geometry is designed to place the reel side in the palm of your hand while you grip the rod, they generally have high speed retrieve ratios and have less line capacity than their bigger cousins.

    In short, the classic round baitcaster is better for throwing bait, and the low profiles are designed for working lures.

    BTW, they are all "conventional" reels.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    Lynchburg, VA
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    Thanks for the explanation. My gut feeling on them was pretty much right, but it's nice to have some confirmation on this.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Russia
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    3
    For reels with disengaging levelwind the more distance between line guide and spool (in reasonable limits) the better.
    The far disposition of line guide requires an elongate shape.
    In other cases (nondisengaging levelwind, without levelwind) the elongate shape isn't needed.
    Nothing else.
    BTW, among the reels with disengaging levelwind there are some quite big and "powerful" one.

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