Surf Fishing Weight Question
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Thread: Surf Fishing Weight Question

  1. #1
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    Surf Fishing Weight Question

    There is a lot of mention here about ounces of weight to use when fishing, in this case surf fishing. The amount of weight talked about seems to be high, 6, 7, 8+ oz.
    I have never surf fished OBX so I don't know. Is so much weight being used to properly load the longer rods to obtain distance or to stay anchored in the strong currents. Or both?

  2. #2
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    That is why you need some many rods.


    I have never fished the OBX. But have AI in MD and other places.

    On a calm day maybe you can use 4oz. will hold bottom. And a rod rated 8-12oz. would not load very well if at all. So you need a rods rated 4 - 6oz or so.

    Some days 4oz. won't hold bottom and you have to use 6, 8 or 10oz. of lead and your rod rated 4 - 6 oz. will not handle the heavier lead weight.

    Then you have to think about the sensitivity of the rod tip and rod length.

    Pretty soon you have more combos then hair on your head.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bosco View Post
    There is a lot of mention here about ounces of weight to use when fishing, in this case surf fishing. The amount of weight talked about seems to be high, 6, 7, 8+ oz.
    I have never surf fished OBX so I don't know. Is so much weight being used to properly load the longer rods to obtain distance or to stay anchored in the strong currents. Or both?
    Depends on what you're fishing for, where they are in the surf, and what you're throwing at them, just like surf fishing the So shores, including Kure. I believe somebody mentioned you fish the So beaches, including Kure? That, and what O said.

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  5. #4
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    Not only do you have to allow for current you also have to allow for bigger baits.
    A 4 oz may hold a couple of shrimp at 50 yards but it may take 8 or more to hold half a menhaden at 100 yards in the same area. Also as the tide picks up speed (the last 2 hours before high) more lead may be needed. In my opinion you need 3 rods to cover all bases.

    1) 7' rod rated to about 3/4 oz. flounder, trout, puppy drum.. ect
    2) 9-10' rated to about 4 oz. med. to light bottom rigs and metal
    3) 11-12' rated to about 12 oz. big drum, cobia, sharks and rays

  6. #5
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    It is really about what is going on in the ocean and where you are fishing and what you are fishing for. You USUALLY want to use the lightest weight that will hold bottom (unless you are fishing the Congo line but that is a whole tread in and of itself, I believe it is in the bible)

    As Orest said this is why most people fishing the OBX will have a bunch of rods with them unless they live there and know what the day is going to bring. That being said I, again, usually bring with me on a trip to the Islands:

    * 7'6" inshore rod - for catching bait and what ever else is in the wash (think a heavy bass rod). I will throw metal and jigs with this and light bottom rigs
    * 9'0" light lead rod 1-4oz - again for close work or very light seas
    * 10'5" "surf rod" - this is what MOST of the world considers a surf rod 4-8oz. Not a true heaver but will still move medium weight and bait out to the 1st or 2nd slough
    * 12-14' Heaver - for throwing bait'n'8+. The ocean kicks a little harder and more dramatic on the OBX than in most places. This is the rods you hear about guys use for trying to hold bottom on heavy surf days and trying to clear the 1st or 2nd bar.

    With this I bring backups or duplicates depending on what time of year it is and what is normally biting. If it is Oct/Nov and big drum is the name of the game I will bring a 2nd heaver to dead stick while I am fishing the other. This one I will have setup with a Shimano 6500 Baitrunner. If it is late spring or summer I will bring an extra light rod for the same reason but the likelihood of catching big drum is low but Cobia and Tarpon are not unheard of. For this I will dead stick a heaver and fish for food a little closer.

    So the round about answer to your question is rods are made for particular weight. Particular weight is used to hold bottom.

    Do you need all of the above rods, hell no! Is it nice to have...

    BTW I have about 15 rods, 7 of which I use regularly. I would save up and buy what you need rather than a bunch of mid-level junk like I have now. I would rather have one GOOD heaver than 4 so-so rods at the same cost. I would rather have one good metal rod than 4 trying to find what I wanted for less. If you are not going to spend a lot of time fishing the OBX, IDK if I would invest in a true heaver and just get a good mid-weight rod 4-8oz and maybe not be able to hit the huge distance with the big lead. Also, a good rod does not make a good cast just like a good rifle does not make a good shooter.

  7. #6
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    Dawgfish - apparently you and I had the same idea at the same time :LOL:

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by spydermn View Post
    Dawgfish - apparently you and I had the same idea at the same time :LOL:
    yep

  9. #8
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    My head is still spinning, a lot of good info. The closest that I have to a heaver is a couple of 12' Ugly Sticks rated 3-8 oz. I also have a 11' St. Croix MOJO rated for 3-8 oz. Dealing with a bad back, these are about all the heavers that I need.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bosco View Post
    My head is still spinning, a lot of good info. The closest that I have to a heaver is a couple of 12' Ugly Sticks rated 3-8 oz. I also have a 11' St. Croix MOJO rated for 3-8 oz. Dealing with a bad back, these are about all the heavers that I need.
    How far can you cast your Ugly Stik though? I have a 10' spinning and 12' casting, but can't cast too far due to the sloppy tip. Maybe there's a special technique out there to cast Ugly Stik surf rods (I'm not even sure if these can be considered true surf rods, minus the length).

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bosco View Post
    There is a lot of mention here about ounces of weight to use when fishing, in this case surf fishing. The amount of weight talked about seems to be high, 6, 7, 8+ oz.
    I have never surf fished OBX so I don't know. Is so much weight being used to properly load the longer rods to obtain distance or to stay anchored in the strong currents. Or both?
    The weight is to hold your bait in place....Not to properly load any given long rod. Where and what u fish for dictates the weight needed to be used, thus the rod needed to be used to throw that weight. You can get 12 foot rods that will only handle up to a few ounces. Then there are 12 foot rods that can handle 16 oz. The weight of the bait, rig, and fishing conditions dictates how heavy of a rod u will need to use

  12. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bosco View Post
    My head is still spinning, a lot of good info. The closest that I have to a heaver is a couple of 12' Ugly Sticks rated 3-8 oz. I also have a 11' St. Croix MOJO rated for 3-8 oz. Dealing with a bad back, these are about all the heavers that I need.
    That 11' mojo would be the first rod I would try with those new casting reels.

  13. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bosco View Post
    There is a lot of mention here about ounces of weight to use when fishing, in this case surf fishing. The amount of weight talked about seems to be high, 6, 7, 8+ oz.
    I have never surf fished OBX so I don't know. Is so much weight being used to properly load the longer rods to obtain distance or to stay anchored in the strong currents. Or both?
    The OBX gets rough as do some of the tidal rivers along the coast. Tide and currents that u cannot see on the seabed will roll and move your bait so 6 - 10 oz maybe needed to hold. A rod that can launch that payload will be needed. As mentioned there is the conga line where these OBX pros have that dance down to a science. I fish mainly tidal rivers so keeping my bait still on the bottom is extremely important. The James River is one of the snaggiest waters I've ever fished. So rolling and twisting into snags gets costly and time consuming. But then again if you remember the area u snag in and fish around it you can usually catch.

  14. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oister View Post
    The weight is to hold your bait in place....Not to properly load any given long rod. Where and what u fish for dictates the weight needed to be used, thus the rod needed to be used to throw that weight. You can get 12 foot rods that will only handle up to a few ounces. Then there are 12 foot rods that can handle 16 oz. The weight of the bait, rig, and fishing conditions dictates how heavy of a rod u will need to use
    Sorry pal That ain't it!

    The purpose is twofold.. Loading the rod and holding the bait stable on the bottom. Properly loading the rod is going to acheive the maximum potential of said rod. A four ounce sinker wouldn't even begin to load a 1509 , 1306, fusion mag etc..but then again I wouldn't choose those to pompano fish with either.

  15. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaBig2na View Post
    Sorry pal That ain't it!

    The purpose is twofold.. Loading the rod and holding the bait stable on the bottom. Properly loading the rod is going to acheive the maximum potential of said rod.
    What do u mean ? If I need 10 to hold I'm gonna use a rod that throws 10.... This same rod that throws 10 will load properly with 10. If I only need 3 to hold a given spot then I will use a rod that loads properly at 3 oz...... Not an 8-12 heaver. What did I say wrong?

  16. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaBig2na View Post
    Sorry pal That ain't it!

    The purpose is twofold.. Loading the rod and holding the bait stable on the bottom. Properly loading the rod is going to acheive the maximum potential of said rod. A four ounce sinker wouldn't even begin to load a 1509 , 1306, fusion mag etc..but then again I wouldn't choose those to pompano fish with either.
    In his question he thinks he needs 8 oz to use a long rod. Long rods can be any length and multiple load ratings. The Op's original question implys he needs a lot of weight to load and use long rods. There are 15 foot crappie rods that only handle a half ounce

  17. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oister View Post
    The weight is to hold your bait in place....Not to properly load any given long rod.
    That what I based my reply on...

    Most all factory made rods will have a "lure weight" go with that for now Bosco.. Usually right around the middle of those numbers you'll find the "sweet spot" of where the rod performs the best.

  18. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaBig2na View Post
    That what I based my reply on...
    Sorry....But I didn't mean it the way it was understood. I was just trying to explain every long rod doesn't need big weights . My bad

  19. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oister View Post
    Sorry....But I didn't mean it the way it was understood. I was just trying to explain every long rod doesn't need big weights . My bad
    "Not to properly load any given long rod". Meaning big weights are not needed to "properly load any LONG rod"...... Nice editing

  20. #19
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    As 2Na says, stick to the weight rating. I didn't mean to junk this up.

  21. #20
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    I use a minimum of 8 oz on my 13ft rods regardless of conditions, they don't load well under less than that, my spot/roundhead rods are rated up to 6 oz but I use 4oz if its holding just lob them out there anyways..

  22. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bosco View Post
    .... Dealing with a bad back, these are about all the heavers that I need.
    Bad backs and heavers don't blend well.
    Hope you're spending some money on having that bad back taken care of, rather than spending money on "heavers", while asking about throwing them with weights up to 8 oz.....especially for "distance", which you seem to be interested in doing.
    Wouldn't want you to waste your hard earned cash on something you might not be able to enjoy! Again, especially when you talk about "properly" loading a longer rod!! Get that back fixed.

  23. #22
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    As said above (not sure if it got lost in the posts) remember that you are not just launching a weight. You are throwing: lead, hook (can weigh a good bit if you are using 6/0-10/0), beads, terminal tackle (swivels, "fishfinder"/snaplock/coastlock, beads and don't forget about the 2-6 oz chunk of fish or other bait you are adding into the equation. A quick est would be when throwing "bait'n'8" is much closer to 12-14oz than 8oz. In that case you need to look for a rod that has a sweet spot of 12-16 oz.

    CCP 8-12oz Casting
    Lamiglass SB160-4M-B Blank - I don't like that this is 1 piece. to hard for me to store and get to the coast
    Penn Battalion 12'surf
    Penn Carnage II 12" surf
    There is also TICA (usually considered a little light to be a true heaver), and other customs but the above are readily available. Personally I am saving up for a CCP. I don't know how true it is but I have been told that a rod with a narrow weight range is a more effective rod at throwing the designed weight than one with a large weight range. That is a question for the rod builders at it is above my pay grade
    as for your rods you have a great mid-weight rod in that Mojo. I would sell the two ugly sticks to some cat fishermen and save towards one of the above customs or a factory CCP or other true heaver. As stated the Ugly sticks are just to whippy to throw heavy lead and the tip is just strange (IMHO). I love their shorter rods for freshwater "bass rods" and both my kids have them for wash fishing for sea rats but as a heaver, not really worth their cost. Again, this is my opinion.

  24. #23
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    I've actually got one of the new ugly stick big waters in 10ft, I think it's 8-12. Keep my fathom 40 on it and have used it for everything from heaving to using as my fighting rod. Was surprised at its performance, not as good as the 12ft on that it replaced(snapped), but for $79 it's a solid choice IMO for a backup or shorter alternative. I was slinging 8 and half a blue about 80yds with no wind relatively easy. In regards to the weight, I will sling 8 of the beach with any of my heavers, just to keep everything in order. On the pier I will drop to 6 depending on conditions

  25. #24
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    Thank you to all that provided info, different opinions is a good thing, more to learn from. One thing is the Ugly Stick compared to the Mojo, weight wise, is like fishing with a 2x4, definitely chunk the Ugly and spike it, too heavy to hold all day by comparison the Mojo is like a feather. I only wish the Mojo was designed to use with Spinning reel and mono.

  26. #25
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    Bosco - it is a nice blank and if you like it that much have it rebuilt for spinning. all that is needed are new guides, reel seat and handles. Depending on where you are in NC there is probably someone close to you that builds customs that could give you a quote to do it. I have taken a couple off the shelf rods and customized them to my liking if I like the blank. One I can think of off the top of my head is a Ocean Master 12' spinning that i had Chuck P. put a different reel seat on because the composite one was flexing to much. at the same time he moved the seat so I could cast it better. He used to be in this page a bit, but I am not sure he still is much but I can get you his info if you want to go that route. Also dont forget that the rod building show is coming up in Feb in Winston Salem. http://www.icrbe.com/
    I am gonna look there for a custom heaver this year. If I don't find one I like more than the CCP then Tommy is getting an order from me.

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